Elizabeth Wilkinson  
 portrait

Elizabeth Wilkinson

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
M.A., Virginia Polytechnic and State University
B.A., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University at University Park
At St. Thomas since 2008
Office
JRC 358
Phone
(651) 962-5632
CV

Siyo! ("Hi" in Tsalagi) I moved here from North Carolina, where I had been studying Cherokee language, literature, and culture. Here, I'm tapping into and expanding my knowledge of the Dakota and Anishinaabe peoples--the indigenous nations of Minnesota. Along with Native American literatures from all over North America, I teach Women's Literature, and Sports Literature; more often than you might expect, these three overlap. My courses often cross-list with Women's Studies and with American Culture and Difference. Miigwitch! ("Thanks" in Anisinaabeg)

Summer 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 559 - 01 Native Amer Literature M - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 30437 Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting the Dream of Wild Health Native American farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook Original Local: Indigenous Food, Stories, and Recipes from the Upper Midwest (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author) and Erdrich's collection of poetry National Monuments; Braiding Sweetgrass, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman and biology professor; the novel Solar Storms by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. One of Leslie Marmon Silko's novels, Ceremony or Almanac of the Dead; and one or more of the following non-fiction texts Winona LaDuke’s All My Relations, David Treuer’s Rez Life, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s God is Red. We'll also read William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe." To contextualize these readings, we'll be learning some of the history of U.S.-Native relations and will discuss essays from a number of the top indigenous scholars at work today. This course satisfies the multicultural distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W03 Games We Play: Sports Lit M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 246
CRN: 42461 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve conflict and drama: man versus man, man versus himself, man versus nature; and, if we believe it possible, man versus the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at the values of America--at the best we have to offer, and the worst. In this class, we will read, enjoy, and analyze short stories, articles, drama, poetry, novels, essays, and participant journalism. The writing load for this course is 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W04 Games We Play: Sports Lit M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 246
CRN: 42462 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve conflict and drama: man versus man, man versus himself, man versus nature; and, if we believe it possible, man versus the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at the values of America--at the best we have to offer, and the worst. In this class, we will read, enjoy, and analyze short stories, articles, drama, poetry, novels, essays, and participant journalism. The writing load for this course is 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2017 Courses

J-Term 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location