Elizabeth Wilkinson  
 portrait

Elizabeth Wilkinson

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
M.A., Virginia Polytechnic and State University
B.A., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University at University Park
At St. Thomas since 2008
Office
JRC 358
Hours
(Fall 2014) M/W/F 3:00-4:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5632

Siyo! ("Hi" in Tsalagi) I moved here from North Carolina, where I had been studying Cherokee language, literature, and culture. Here, I'm tapping into and expanding my knowledge of the Dakota and Anishinaabe peoples--the indigenous nations of Minnesota. Along with Native American literatures from all over North America, I teach Women's Literature, and Sports Literature; more often than you might expect, these three overlap. My courses often cross-list with Women's Studies and with American Culture and Difference. Miigwitch! ("Thanks" in Anisinaabeg)

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - 04 Travel: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212
CRN: 42392 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people that we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 41 HONORS: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 42390 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for Aquinas Honors Scholars Program students only.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 217 - 01 Multicultural Literature M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 222
CRN: 40473 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of authors drawn from the literature of one of the following: (a) American communities of color; (b) postcolonial peoples; (c) diasporic peoples. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts from at least one such literary tradition, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THTR 111U - A02 Intro to Theatre in Greece - - - - - - - -
CRN: 10279 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Amy M. Muse, Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 337 - 01 Native Amer Lit & Environment M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212
CRN: 21836 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Wozupi Native American farming co-op. Texts that may make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may have a visit and a cooking class by the author!), BRAIDING SWEETGRASS by Robin Wall Kimmerer, SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, CEREMONY by Leslie Marmon Silkko, Zitkala-Ša’s boarding school trilogy, William Apess 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe,” and selections from David Treuer’s REZ LIFE and from Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. This course satisfies the Human Diversity core requirement and the Diversity distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)