Doug Phillips portrait

Doug Phillips

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 349
Hours
(Fall 2016) M/W 10:00-11:30am; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5655

Writers whose sentences sparkle on the page -- Shakespeare, Virginia Woolf, Samuel Beckett, James Baldwin, David Foster Wallace -- are the likely stars of the classes I teach. I'm also interested in philosophy and critical theory, from the Ancients to Simone de Beauvoir to Adorno to Zizek. My publications include pieces on Shakespeare, Beckett, Wittgenstein, Zizek, Heidegger, Harold Pinter, David Foster Wallace, Alan Bennett, T.S. Eliot, and, most recently, Wallace Stevens.

 

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W08 Existential America - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 313
CRN: 42610 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Alexander Maksik's YOU DESERVE NOTHING, Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Jon Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, Flannery O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, James Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Nella Larsen's QUICKSAND, and Horace McCoy's THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY? In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W09 Existential America - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 313
CRN: 42611 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Alexander Maksik's YOU DESERVE NOTHING, Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Jon Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, Flannery O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, James Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Nella Larsen's QUICKSAND, and Horace McCoy's THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY? In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 220 - L01 The Classical Tradition M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 209
CRN: 41611 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips What might it mean to speak of “the classical tradition?” What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? From the ancient Greek gods in their serenity to the howls of the damned in Dante’s vision of the afterlife, whether mythological or theological, the works to be studied engage us in the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, including some interactions of the European traditions with ancient or medieval Asian, Mesopotamian, or Middle Eastern literatures. Authors may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Rumi, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2017 Courses

J-Term 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2017 Courses

Spring 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - W02 The Sentence is a Lonely Place M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210
CRN: 22257 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips The title of this course is taken from Gary Lutz's essay of the same name, the upshot of which (both this course and Lutz's essay) is to focus our attention on fashioning sentences that hook, dazzle, surprise, spur double-takes, stab, make weak-kneed, and seduce. We will find our inspiration in a whirligig of writers (dramatists, novelists, poets, and essayists) whose syntactical moves and amped-up diction are worthy of thieving: Shakespeare (of course!), Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, David Foster Wallace, Barry Hannah, William Gass, David Markson, Alexander Theroux, and Christine Schutt--to name but a possible few. Plus, we'll supplement our study and practice with a critical and theoretical examination of style, using such sources as F.L. Lucas's STYLE: THE ART OF WRITING WELL and Richard Lanham's STYLE: AN ANTI-TEXTBOOK, as well as essays by the aforementioned Woolf, Gass, Theroux, Wallace, and Lutz. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)