Daniel Jones

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 325
Hours
(Spring 2017) M/W/F 1:45-3:30pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5626

Spring 2017 Courses

Spring 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W08 Laugh 'Til It Hurts: Humor M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 313
CRN: 22265 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones Course Description: In THE MYSTERIOUS STRANGER MANUSCRIPTS, Mark Twain wrote that humanity "has unquestionably one really effective weapon" against the injustices and inequalities of the world--"laughter," as "[a]gainst the assault of Laughter nothing can stand." Some of the best known American authors have used literary devices such as satire, irony, and dark humor to examine, question, and undermine a variety of social and cultural subjects. In this course, we will examine how the subversive nature of American humor is used as an instrument of social change by looking at texts that challenged preconceived notions and long-held beliefs about politics, war, historical figures and events, social conventions, cultural trends, and class, racial, and gender issues. Texts include Mark Twain's PUDD'NHEAD WILSON, Kurt Vonnegut’s SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE, Percival Everett’s ERASURE, Gillian Flynn’s GONE GIRL, and Chuck Palahniuk’s FIGHT CLUB. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2017 Courses

Summer 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - W02 Sleuth: Mystery Literature M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 42557 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones From its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century, mystery fiction has been a highly formulaic genre. Add a dead body, sprinkle in a handful of usual suspects, provide a quirky detective/police officer to solve the case, occasionally mix in a guilty butler, and you have a proven formula for a potential best-seller. However, a close examination of mystery fiction reveals that there’s more than meets the (private) eye. The authors in this genre often have their fingers on the pulse of the society from which they come, as their texts reflect and critique notions of race, class, gender, social institutions, and more. Additionally, the genre has expanded from the locked-room format employed by writers such as Conan Doyle and Christie and the shady back alleys employed by hard-boiled writers like Hammett and Chandler to focus on things like international politics and espionage, featured in the works of writers like le Carre. Throughout the semester, we’ll examine a handful of texts from the perspective of how these fit with the mystery fiction genre and what these texts have to say about the world they come from, and possibly our own world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - W03 Sleuth: Mystery Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212
CRN: 42558 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones From its beginnings in the mid-nineteenth century, mystery fiction has been a highly formulaic genre. Add a dead body, sprinkle in a handful of usual suspects, provide a quirky detective/police officer to solve the case, occasionally mix in a guilty butler, and you have a proven formula for a potential best-seller. However, a close examination of mystery fiction reveals that there’s more than meets the (private) eye. The authors in this genre often have their fingers on the pulse of the society from which they come, as their texts reflect and critique notions of race, class, gender, social institutions, and more. Additionally, the genre has expanded from the locked-room format employed by writers such as Conan Doyle and Christie and the shady back alleys employed by hard-boiled writers like Hammett and Chandler to focus on things like international politics and espionage, featured in the works of writers like le Carre. Throughout the semester, we’ll examine a handful of texts from the perspective of how these fit with the mystery fiction genre and what these texts have to say about the world they come from, and possibly our own world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)