Catherine Craft-Fairchild  portrait

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Professor of English / Graduate English Program Director
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester
B.A., Canisius College
At St. Thomas since 1989
Office
JRC 319
Phone
(651) 962-5614

I really enjoy learning with and from my students, so I teach an eclectic range of courses that allow me to explore new areas and share my interests with others. Although my primary specialty is 18th-century British literature, I also teach women's studies, literature and film, Jewish literature, and most recently, a transatlantic course that combines British and American literature. My current research centers on the writing of Anglo-Irish novelist and educational reformer Maria Edgeworth, while earlier research focused on 18th- and 19th-century women writers more generally, with particular reference to the image and experience of masquerade.

Summer 2014 Courses

Summer 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - P1 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F 0935 - 1040 OEC 311
CRN: 41314 4 Credit Hours Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.
GENG 572 - 01 Amer/Brit Social Protest Novel - T - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 247
CRN: 42367 3 Credit Hours In INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL, Harriet Jacobs writes, "I had heard much about the oppression of the poor in Europe...But when I visited them in their little thatched cottages, I felt that the condition of even the meanest and most ignorant among them was vastly superior to the condition of the most favored slaves in America." In this course, we will closely examine Jacobs's claim, studying fiction and non-fiction of the nineteenth-century in England and the United States that deals with the Industrial Revolution and the plight of both free and enslaved workers. In British Literature, it was common to refer to "slaves of the needle" and "factory slaves," while American slave narratives, like Jacobs's, often contained comparisons between the conditions of poor workers in England and the wholly unpaid workers in America. The two countries were economically interdependent, and their often exploitative factory and agricultural systems reinforced each other. Many writers produced works of social protest intended to change laws or galvanize action to improve condistions for both nations' dispossed peoples. The reading list will include the following: Adam Smith's THE WEALTH OF NATIONS; Charlotte Bronte's SHIRLEY; Elizabeth Gaskell's MARY BARTON and NORTH AND SOUTH; selected writings of Karl Marx and Fredrich Engels; Harriet Beecher Stowe's UNCLE TOM'S CABIN; Harriet Jacobs's INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL; Rebecca Harding Davis's LIFE IN THE IRON MILLS; and Upton Sinclair's THE JUNGLE. This course satisfies the pre-1900 American Literature distribution requirement.

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location