Catherine Craft-Fairchild  portrait

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Professor of English
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester
B.A., Canisius College
At St. Thomas since 1989
Office
JRC 319
Phone
(651) 962-5614

I really enjoy learning with and from my students, so I teach an eclectic range of courses that allow me to explore new areas and share my interests with others. Although my primary specialty is 18th-century British literature, I also teach women's studies, literature and film, Jewish literature, and most recently, a transatlantic course that combines British and American literature. My current research centers on the writing of Anglo-Irish novelist and educational reformer Maria Edgeworth, while earlier research focused on 18th- and 19th-century women writers more generally, with particular reference to the image and experience of masquerade.

Summer 2015 Courses

Summer 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2015 Courses

Fall 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 02 In the Beginning: Genesis Lit M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 306
CRN: 42446 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild The Biblical book of Genesis has offered to every age stories that touch on the most basic questions of human life. Giving readers a vision of the creation of the world, examining the origins of evil, tracing the beginnings of family life and the disruptions possible within it, Genesis is an inexhaustible source of foundational myths and beliefs. It is not surprising, then, that, from one generation to the next, writers have drawn upon Genesis for their inspiration. This course will study the book of Genesis in a literary context, exploring some of the works that issue from it. Along with Robert Alter's translation of Genesis, we will read C. S. Lewis's PERELANDRA, local author Rebecca Kanner's SINNERS AND THE SEA: THE UNTOLD STORY OF NOAH'S WIFE, and Yasmina Reza's GODS OF CARNAGE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 08 In the Beginning: Genesis Lit M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 306
CRN: 42447 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild The Biblical book of Genesis has offered to every age stories that touch on the most basic questions of human life. Giving readers a vision of the creation of the world, examining the origins of evil, tracing the beginnings of family life and the disruptions possible within it, Genesis is an inexhaustible source of foundational myths and beliefs. It is not surprising, then, that, from one generation to the next, writers have drawn upon Genesis for their inspiration. This course will study the book of Genesis in a literary context, exploring some of the works that issue from it. Along with Robert Alter's translation of Genesis, we will read C. S. Lewis's PERELANDRA, local author Rebecca Kanner's SINNERS AND THE SEA: THE UNTOLD STORY OF NOAH'S WIFE, and Yasmina Reza's GODS OF CARNAGE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 628 - 01 Criminals/Rogues:18th-C Brit L - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42435 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild The eighteenth century in England has been called the "Age of Reason." While Locke, Newton, Addison, Pope, and Johnson attempted to create order out of chaos, other writers and readers gravitated toward the flip sides of reason--irrationality, madness, and criminality. In this course, we will explore the shadow-side of the Enlightenment, reading Restoration comedies about sexual intrigue; the "secret histories" of disguise and mistaken identity by Eliza Haywood; Daniel Defoe's take on criminal biography in MOLL FLANDERS; and the rollicking drama about rogues and thieves, John Gay's BEGGAR'S OPERA. We will also study the more developed and nuanced studies of social mores and their violation by late-century writers; important portraits of the "outsider" include Elizabeth Inchbald's A SIMPLE STORY and William Godwin's CALEB WILLIAMS. Bakhtin on the canivalesque and Foucault on criminality and the rise of prisons, among other critics and theorists, will help to structure our discussions. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2016 Courses

J-Term 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location