Catherine Craft-Fairchild  portrait

Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Professor of English / Graduate English Program Director
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester
B.A., Canisius College
At St. Thomas since 1989
Office
JRC 319
Hours
(Fall 2014) M/W/F 11:00am-12:00pm; T 5:00-6:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5614

I really enjoy learning with and from my students, so I teach an eclectic range of courses that allow me to explore new areas and share my interests with others. Although my primary specialty is 18th-century British literature, I also teach women's studies, literature and film, Jewish literature, and most recently, a transatlantic course that combines British and American literature. My current research centers on the writing of Anglo-Irish novelist and educational reformer Maria Edgeworth, while earlier research focused on 18th- and 19th-century women writers more generally, with particular reference to the image and experience of masquerade.

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - P1 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 306
CRN: 41314 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 572 - 01 Amer/Brit Social Protest Novel - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 247
CRN: 42367 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild In INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL, Harriet Jacobs writes, "I had heard much about the oppression of the poor in Europe...But when I visited them in their little thatched cottages, I felt that the condition of even the meanest and most ignorant among them was vastly superior to the condition of the most favored slaves in America." In this course, we will closely examine Jacobs's claim, studying fiction and non-fiction of the nineteenth-century in England and the United States that deals with the Industrial Revolution and the plight of both free and enslaved workers. In British Literature, it was common to refer to "slaves of the needle" and "factory slaves," while American slave narratives, like Jacobs's, often contained comparisons between the conditions of poor workers in England and the wholly unpaid workers in America. The two countries were economically interdependent, and their often exploitative factory and agricultural systems reinforced each other. Many writers produced works of social protest intended to change laws or galvanize action to improve condistions for both nations' dispossed peoples. The reading list will include the following: Adam Smith's THE WEALTH OF NATIONS; Charlotte Bronte's SHIRLEY; Elizabeth Gaskell's MARY BARTON and NORTH AND SOUTH; selected writings of Karl Marx and Fredrich Engels; Harriet Beecher Stowe's UNCLE TOM'S CABIN; Harriet Jacobs's INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL; Rebecca Harding Davis's LIFE IN THE IRON MILLS; and Upton Sinclair's THE JUNGLE. This course satisfies the pre-1900 American Literature distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 04 Desperate Housewives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212
CRN: 21823 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild As the popular TV show DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES wrapped up its final season, and as the REAL HOUSEWIVES franchise stakes its claim on more and more locations, the housewife phenomenon provokes some significant questions about where housewives fit into our "post-feminist world." Is a housewife a symbol of social status, privilege, and perfection? Do women still aspire towards that domestic ideal? Is it realistic or obtainable? How do current notions of "housewife" tally with our perception of motherhood, marriage, and social conventions? And what makes housewives desperate? This course seeks to examine some of literature's "desperate housewives" (complicated female characters in domestic settings) and asks why they respond to their circumstances in the manner they do. We will explore why so many literary depictions of housewives portray them as profoundly troubled by boredom, isolation, infidelity, and emptiness. Possible texts may include Henrik Ibsen's A DOLL HOUSE, Betty Friedan's THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE, Virginia Woolf's MRS. DALLOWAY, and Jon Robin Baitz's OTHER DESERT CITIES. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 05 Desperate Housewives M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 21853 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild As the popular TV show DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES wrapped up its final season, and as the REAL HOUSEWIVES franchise stakes its claim on more and more locations, the housewife phenomenon provokes some significant questions about where housewives fit into our "post-feminist world." Is a housewife a symbol of social status, privilege, and perfection? Do women still aspire towards that domestic ideal? Is it realistic or obtainable? How do current notions of "housewife" tally with our perception of motherhood, marriage, and social conventions? And what makes housewives desperate? This course seeks to examine some of literature's "desperate housewives" (complicated female characters in domestic settings) and asks why they respond to their circumstances in the manner they do. We will explore why so many literary depictions of housewives portray them as profoundly troubled by boredom, isolation, infidelity, and emptiness. Possible texts may include Henrik Ibsen's A DOLL HOUSE, Betty Friedan's THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE, Virginia Woolf's MRS. DALLOWAY, and Jon Robin Baitz's OTHER DESERT CITIES. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 218 - 01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440
CRN: 20416 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild This course will focus on the history of literature by women. It will concentrate on the traditions in Britain and America, but also will include some attention to non-Western women writers. It will address issues of canon formation, as well as the role of gender in the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)