Brian Greening

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 308
Hours
(Spring 2015) By appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5692

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 09 New Orleans: River & Its City - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 307
CRN: 22471 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brian W. Greening Situated at the mouth of the Mississippi River, New Orleans has a certain romantic, provocative charm--one that pulls at natives and visitors alike. More so now than in the past, New Orleans is defined by spectacle and excess, both of which are part and parcel of the city's primary industry of tourism. Drawn in by dazzling events like Mardi Gras, the alluring architecture of the French Quarter and the promise of debauchery, tourists rarely bother uncovering the Crescent City's rich history. This class will remedy that oversight. Using the literature of Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, and John Kennedy O'Toole, as well as various social and environmental histories, we will explore pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans in all its complexities. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2015 Courses

Summer 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2015 Courses

Fall 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 14 Shades of Harlem in Contemp US - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 212
CRN: 42705 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brian W. Greening In 2008, the people of the United States elected Barack Obama President. In the aftermath of Obama’s victory, with our first black president ensconced in the White House, several pundits asserted that we are now living in a “post-racial era” in America. Though appealing, this flowery “post-racial” sentiment glosses over a complex history of American race relations following Reconstruction. In an effort to extend (rather than put an end to) the American discourse on race, this class will attend to the questions of how, where, and when race has and still matters in the United States. We will revisit several works of fiction and non-fiction from the Harlem Renaissance, including classic texts like Jean Toomer’s CANE, James Weldon Johnson’s THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN EX-COLORED MAN, and Zora Neale Hurston’s MULES AND MEN. We’ll also reach forward, incorporating more contemporary poets, playwrights, novelists, and cultural critics, including but not limited to Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, Henry Dumas and Doris Betts. Finally, we will use W.E.B. DuBois’ s seminal text, SOULS OF BLACK FOLK, as a primary source for the work we will do throughout the semester. Students should be prepared to compose a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)