Andrew Scheiber  portrait

Andrew Scheiber

Professor of English
Degree
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University
At St. Thomas since 1990
Office
JRC 305
Hours
(Fall 2016) M/W 11:15am-1:15pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5611
CV

I’m interested in the way that literature is both affected by, and in turn enriches our view of, other aspects of history and culture, especially with respect to evolutionary theory, blues and jazz, and the struggles of working people in an industrial (and now post-industrial) world.  With writers like Henry James, Willa Cather, and Ralph Ellison as my guides, in my research and in my teaching I explore the ways in which authors are both challenged and inspired to make literary art out of their engagement with such cultural and historical phenomena.

 

J-Term 2017 Courses

J-Term 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2017 Courses

Spring 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W04 Blues & Jazz in Literature - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 212
CRN: 22174 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber In this class we’ll examine how blues and jazz inform, inspire, and otherwise find a place in poetry, fiction, and drama both within and beyond the African American literary tradition. Readings will consist of a selection of poems, novels, and plays that show this blues presence, as well as readings in musicology and history that will provide important background information on the music and its origins. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 204
CRN: 21870 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2017 Courses

Summer 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location