Andrew Scheiber  portrait

Andrew Scheiber

Professor of English
Degree
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University
At St. Thomas since 1990
Office
JRC 305
Hours
(Fall 2017) M/W 11:45am-1:15pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5611
CV

I’m interested in the way that literature is both affected by, and in turn enriches our view of, other aspects of history and culture, especially with respect to evolutionary theory, blues and jazz, and the struggles of working people in an industrial (and now post-industrial) world.  With writers like Henry James, Willa Cather, and Ralph Ellison as my guides, in my research and in my teaching I explore the ways in which authors are both challenged and inspired to make literary art out of their engagement with such cultural and historical phenomena.

For more about my interests in literature and literary theory, check out my blog, titled Literature: Fragments from the Missing Manual.

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - 27 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 206
CRN: 40998 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 31 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 204
CRN: 40981 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 325
CRN: 42447 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W09 At the Crossroads of the Blues - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 309
CRN: 22393 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Though born of necessity as a response to racial oppression and the legacy of slavery, the music we call “the blues” has traveled far—across time, geography, racial boundaries, and even beyond its original musical forms. In this class we’ll look at some of the crossings and intersections that the blues have travelled through. We’ll see how the blues are not just a form of music, but also a way of making art more generally, and a way of understanding the human condition. This course does not assume any prior musical knowledge, but welcomes anyone who is ready to read, listen, and reflect on the often challenging, disturbing, but ultimately life-affirming messages of the blues. Readings will include Zora Neale Hurston’s THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD, August Wilson’s MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM, and blues-themed poems by authors from the African American and other literary traditions. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W10 At the Crossroads of the Blues - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 325
CRN: 22394 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Though born of necessity as a response to racial oppression and the legacy of slavery, the music we call “the blues” has traveled far—across time, geography, racial boundaries, and even beyond its original musical forms. In this class we’ll look at some of the crossings and intersections that the blues have travelled through. We’ll see how the blues are not just a form of music, but also a way of making art more generally, and a way of understanding the human condition. This course does not assume any prior musical knowledge, but welcomes anyone who is ready to read, listen, and reflect on the often challenging, disturbing, but ultimately life-affirming messages of the blues. Readings will include Zora Neale Hurston’s THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD, August Wilson’s MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM, and blues-themed poems by authors from the African American and other literary traditions. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 371 - L01 A Century of "Unruly" Women M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 107
CRN: 21704 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Nineteenth Century America was dominated by a gender ideology of “separate spheres,” in which large public questions—politics, business, national identity—were largely seen as the realm of the male and women were relegated to the “domestic” spheres of home, family, and unpaid charitable work. The literature of this period tells a different story, however; the genre of literary fiction was dominated by best-selling female writers who confronted the barriers to women’s full participation in the life of the nation in ways that were by turns direct and cleverly subversive. Even male writers of the period created vivid, powerful female protagonists who registered men’s anxiety about, and admiration of, the insurgent female moral and creative energies of the era. In this course we’ll read a generous selection of writings (mainly by women, but a few by men as well) that exemplify in literary form the challenges to the prevailing gender norms of the time, most significantly in the areas of politics, economics, and literary production. Likely titles to be examined include Catharine Sedgwick’s HOPE LESLIE, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s BLITHEDALE ROMANCE, and Kate Chopin’s THE AWAKENING, among others Likely Students will write a series of short reflection papers, one research report, and an extended final essay on a selected author or work from the course readings. This course counts both as a Contexts and Convergences course for English majors and as an Early American Literature class; it also satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn class. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)