Amy Muse  portrait

Amy Muse

Associate Professor of English / Department Chair
Degree
Ph.D., Auburn University
M.A., Washington University (St. Louis)
B.A., University of Akron
At St. Thomas since 2001
Office
JRC 334
Hours
(Spring 2015) M 4:30-6:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5643

I am a drama specialist; in both teaching and research I’m interested in the intersections of dramatic literature, performance theory, and theatre history. My publications are fairly eclectic—I’ve written on female Hamlets, theatre of the invisible-made-visible, plays about the 1820s Greek Revolution, Byron’s secret literary influences—and I encourage personally-engaged, historically-embedded, idiosyncratic essay writing in my courses. My current research projects explore connections between theatre and tourism in Greece (where I teach study abroad courses) and theatre as a space for developing intimacy. You can usually find me teaching Shakespeare and other courses on drama, performance & social change, British Romanticism, the classical tradition, literary criticism, and essay writing.

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 622 - 01 Shakespeare & Co. in Ren. Thtr M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 OEC 210
CRN: 21830 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Amy M. Muse Though Ben Jonson memorably penned that Shakespeare was “not of an age, but for all time,” he was of an age—the Renaissance—in which theatre was a growth industry and the drama skyrocketed in richness and variation. We will dig into that theatrical world and view Shakespeare alongside contemporaries and competitors such as Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Middleton, John Fletcher, John Webster, Thomas Heywood, and Philip Massinger. What were they obsessed with? Many of the same things we are, which we’ll investigate in two case studies: on threats and prospects of change in marriage (in plays such as THE TAMING OF THE SHREW and its table-turning sequel THE TAMER TAMED, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, THE DUCHESS OF MALFI, and A WOMAN KILLED WITH KINDNESS) and threats and prospects of the Islamic world (in such plays as TAMBURLAINE THE GREAT, A CHRISTIAN TURNED TURK, THE RENEGADO, and OTHELLO). We’ll engage in two- and three-dimensional literary criticism (that is, finely-grained study of aesthetics and dramaturgy with much reading aloud and taking of parts) and contextualize our understanding, invoke the presence of the past, through reading historical and political documents. This course satisfies the pre-1800 British Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 06 Master's Essay - - - - - - - -
CRN: 22902 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Amy M. Muse

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2015 Courses

Summer 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2015 Courses

Fall 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - 03 The Play's the Thing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210
CRN: 42441 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Amy M. Muse "The play's the thing," Hamlet declares, "wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king." He knows that a theatrical production can prick his uncle's guilty conscience and reveal the truth of his murderous actions. In this course we will read dramatic literature, engage in performance exercises, and work with theatre artists to illuminate psychological questions about human consciousness and connection, intimacy, identity formation, and psychopathology. Course texts will include research in psychology and theatre theory alongside plays such as BETRAYAL, DEAD MAN’S CELL PHONE, SIX CHARACTERS IN SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR, HEDDA GABLER, and EQUUS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)