Alexis Easley  portrait

Alexis Easley

Professor of English / Graduate English Program Director
Degree
Ph.D., University of Oregon
B.S., M.F.A., University of Alaska Fairbanks
At St. Thomas since 2005
Office
JRC 335
Hours
(Spring 2017) T 4:00-5:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5653
CV

As a researcher, teacher, and editor, I am interested in everything Victorian. I recently published two books, Literary Celebrity, Gender, and Victorian Authorship, 1850–1914 (U Delaware P, 2011) and Terrifying Transformations: An Anthology of Werewolf Fiction, 1838-1896 (Valancourt, 2012). I serve as editor of Victorian Periodicals Review, an international scholarly journal dedicated to research on the Victorian press. I also serve as co-editor of the two-volume Ashgate Companion to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals (forthcoming, 2015-16). My other current research and teaching interests include Victorian women writers, Victorian drama, working-class poetry, the Brontës, Harriet Martineau, Charles Dickens, detective fiction, Gothic novels, and professional editing.

Spring 2017 Courses

Spring 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W16 Monstrous Love - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 OEC 310
CRN: 22178 4 Credit Hours Instructor: M. A. Easley Love is one of our most cherished emotions, but it can become monstrous when selfishness, jealousy, and insecurity come into play. In literature, failed love is sometimes figured as a literal monster (e.g., Victor Frankenstein's creature), which destroys everything in its path. Other times, monstrosity is figured as a person who loses all sense of humanity, as in Gillian Flynn's novel GONE GIRL. These literary works not only show the damage caused by monstrous love but also challenge us to imagine healthier kinds of relationships founded on empathy, trust, and altruism. In addition to FRANKENSTEIN and GONE GIRL, course readings will include Yann Martel's THE LIFE OF PI and Shakespeare's KING LEAR, which we will see in performance at the Guthrie Theater. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 01 Master's Essay - - - - - - - -
CRN: 21838 3 Credit Hours Instructor: M. A. Easley

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 10 Master's Essay - - - - - - - -
CRN: 22939 3 Credit Hours Instructor: M. A. Easley

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 9 Master's Essay - - - - - - - -
CRN: 22792 3 Credit Hours Instructor: M. A. Easley

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2017 Courses

Summer 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42455 3 Credit Hours Instructor: M. A. Easley An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)