The Distinguished Larson Lecture is named in honor of Dr. William D. Larson. (Click to learn more.)

This lecture series began in 2011 with a grant from the Jean Dreyfus Boissevain Lectureship for Undergraduate Institutions. Due to the great interest from students, faculty, and alumni, the chemistry department has dedicated funds to continuing the lectureship as an annual event and naming it in honor of long time chemistry faculty member Dr. William D. Larson.

Dr. William D. Larson began his career during the 1931-32 academic year. Professor Larson was one of the founding members of the chemistry department, when our institution was then the College of St. Thomas.  During his 40 years of teaching physical and analytical chemistry, Professor Larson was the driving force behind creating one of the strongest chemistry programs among private colleges in the Midwest.  Dr. Larson served as the chairman of the Department of Chemistry and chairman of the Division of Science and Mathematics for 17 years.  After his retirement in 1972 he continued to provide valuable academic mentoring to students.  The legacy of his commitment to teaching and research lives on in the William D. Larson Scholarship.

Dr. Geri Richmond to be the 3rd Annual Larson Lecturer

 

The University of St. Thomas Department of Chemistry, with financial support from
The College of Arts and Sciences, presents:

The Distinguished Larson Lecture 

Presented by Dr. Geri Richmond September 25th and 26th, 2014

Geri Richmond Larson Lectureship Photo 1

For General Audiences: Surf, Sink or Swim:  Understanding Environmentally Important Processes at Water Surfaces
7:30 p.m. Thursday, September 25th - OEC Auditorium

Technical Presentation: From Lava Lamps to Salad Dressing:  Where Oil Meets Water
12:15 p.m. Friday, September 26th - JRC 126


About Dr. Richmond:

Dr. Richmond is the president-elect of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has the title of Presidential Chair and Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oregon.  She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is the winner of numerous prestigious awards including the Pittsburgh Spectroscopy Award (Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh), Davisson-Germer Prize for Atomic or Surface Physics (American Physical Society) and the ACS Charles L. Parsons Award.

Larson Lecture 2013-2014

The Chemistry Department hosted Professor Geoffrey Coates of Cornell University for a series of lectures in September 2013. He spoke about his research in developing environmentally benign plastic materials and new synthetic methods for the production of novel polymers from common readily available feedstock material.

From the 2013-2014 Lecture Series:‌

 

The University of St. Thomas Department of Chemistry, with financial support from
The College of Arts and Sciences, presents

The Distinguished Larson Lecture 

Presented by Dr. Geoffrey Coates September 5th and 6th, 2013

For General Audiences:
In Pursuit of the Perfect Plastic
7:30 p.m. Thursday, September 5th - ASC 378A: North Woulfe Alumni Hall

Technical Presentation:
New Polymers from Old Monomers 

Advances Enabled through Catalyst Design and Discovery 
12:15 p.m. Friday, September 6th - John Roach Center Room 126

About Geoffrey Coates:

Professor Coates is currently the Associate Chair of Chemistry at Cornell University and has received numerous awards in recognition of his contributions to polymer chemistry and science education.  These include an NSF CAREER award, Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar award, Research Corporation Innovation award and he has also been granted an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship.

Larson Lecture 2012-2012

The Chemistry Department hosted Professor Jay Keasling of the University of California Berkeley for a series of lectures in May 2013. He spoke about his research in designing and controlling biological routes to complex molecules.

From the 2012-2013 Lecture Series:

Jay Keasling Lecture

The University of St. Thomas Department of Chemistry, with financial support from
The Jean Dreyfus Boissevain Lectureship for Undergraduate Institutions, presents

The Distinguished Larson Lecture 

Presented by Dr. Jay Keasling May 1-3, 2013

For General Audiences:
Life 2.0: Engineering Biologyfor Sustainable Development
7:00 p.m. Wednesday, May 1st - ASC 378: Woulfe Alumni Hall

Technical Presentation:
Advanced Fuels from Advanced Plants
12:15 p.m. Friday, May 3rd - John Roach Center Room 126

About  Jay Keasling:

Dr. Jay D. Keasling is the Hubbard Howe Jr. Distinguished Professor of Biochemical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the Founding Head of the Synthetic Biology Department in the Physical Biosciences Division at Lawrence
Berkeley National Laboratory, and CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute. He is considered one of the foremost authorities in synthetic biology, especially in the field of metabolic engineering. His research focuses on engineering microorganisms for environmentally friendly synthesis of small molecules or degradation of environmental contaminants. For example, Keasling’s laboratory has engineered bacteria and yeast to produce polymers, a precursor to the antimalarial drug artemisinin, advanced biofuels, and soil microorganisms to accumulate uranium and degrade nerve agents. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the 2006 Scientist of the Year Award from Discover Magazine, and a $42.5 million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to develop and distribute the low-cost malaria treatment created in his lab. Dr. Keasling is a Fellow of the American
Academy of Microbiology. He received his Bachelor’s Degree at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and his Ph.D from the University of Michigan.