CELC Home / Academics / Leadership in Student Affairs
Graduates of the Leadership in Student Affairs program are prepared to create a dynamic learning environment for higher education students.
Leadership in Student Affairs


Designed through a collaborative effort of student affairs leaders and program faculty, the Master of Arts degree and Certificate in Leadership in Student Affairs prepare you to lead in higher education. Our program has a unique focus on leadership, social justice, and theory to practice providing an opportunity for broad application upon graduation. Student affairs professionals work side-by-side with faculty and staff to create a dynamic learning environment for students. Every day, they help to shape the mission and culture of their college or university. 

What some of our alumni are doing:

  • Academic Advisor – University of Minnesota
  • Residence Hall Director – Loyola University at Chicago
  • Director of Admission – Hamline University
  • Assistant Director of Admissions and Financial Aid – St. Catherine University
  • Education Abroad Advisor – College of St. Benedict/St. John’s University


What you can earn

photo
  • Master of Arts (M.A.)
  • Certificate

 

Where you'll learn

photo
  • On our Minneapolis campus

 

 

 

When you can start

photo
  • Spring semester begins: February 2, 2015


Questions about this program

Lexie Warlof

Graduate Assistant

(651) 962-4891

SoE-LSA@stthomas.edu


Program Details

For the Certificate

Student affairs personnel are employed in a wide range of institutional types and functional areas. To function effectively in these settings, student affairs professionals must understand the purposes of higher education and the role of student affairs personnel in facilitating learning and personal development among students. Knowledge and appreciation of the history, philosophy, and theoretical underpinnings of the field, as well as current and emerging issues facing higher education are key to working as an educator in student affairs. This course is designed to introduce you to the student affairs profession and the higher education environment in which it functions.

This course focuses on the background assumptions that shape both student learning and development. A variety of learning and human development theories will be explored. The course examines how students learn and construct meaning and create knowledge. Further, it explores theories and models on how to facilitate the development of a student-centered integrated learning environment..

This course explores and examines the differing and shared belief systems and practices between public and private higher education. Special attention will be given to moral reasoning, ethical frameworks, and how power dynamics affect ethics in practice.

This is the capstone course for the leadership in student affairs concentration in the master's program in educational leadership. It integrates the coursework and experiences in to a systemic view of student affairs and higher education and the practitioner's role in optimizing the student learning experience. It focuses on strategies for influencing organizational culture in order to provide an enriched integrated learning experience for the college student.

TOTAL 12 Credits

For the Master of Arts (M.A.)

This course begins the required three-course M.A. or Ed. research sequence. After an introductory overview of social research, it emphasizes historical and ethnographic approaches to thinking about collecting and analyzing information. Course activities provide an opportunity to experience doing research using historical and qualitative methods.

Student affairs personnel are employed in a wide range of institutional types and functional areas. To function effectively in these settings, student affairs professionals must understand the purposes of higher education and the role of student affairs personnel in facilitating learning and personal development among students. Knowledge and appreciation of the history, philosophy, and theoretical underpinnings of the field, as well as current and emerging issues facing higher education are key to working as an educator in student affairs. This course is designed to introduce you to the student affairs profession and the higher education environment in which it functions.

This course explores and examines the differing and shared belief systems and practices between public and private higher education. Special attention will be given to moral reasoning, ethical frameworks, and how power dynamics affect ethics in practice.

This course explores the connections of theory and practice in administrative leadership and management of student affairs. Beginning with higher education finance and budget management the course broadens to include the principles of supervision and management and their connections to professional standards and best practices. You will be provided the opportunity to practice leadership and management in your own department while also creating the partnerships needed within student affairs and with other faculty and staff colleagues.

The student is involved in a 250-hour internship experience with an on-site mentor at a college or university. Interns keep a reflective journal and bring the fruits of their reflections to the readings and discussions of EDLD 760 Future Trends in Student Affairs.

The student is involved in a 250-hour internship experience with an on-site mentor at a college or university. Interns participate in a seminar that emphasizes the importance of reflective practice. Prerequisite:
EDLD 785.

This course examines how educational organizations develop and change and how leaders and followers interact within organizations from several theoretical and conceptual perspectives. Students observe the workings of educational institutions and programs, interview educational leaders, and analyze their own understanding and practice of leadership.

This course focuses on the background assumptions that shape both student learning and development. A variety of learning and human development theories will be explored. The course examines how students learn and construct meaning and create knowledge. Further, it explores theories and models on how to facilitate the development of a student-centered integrated learning environment.

Issues of difference are directly connected to our work, lives, communities in which we live, and the emerging global society. Answers may not always be found; however, by being flexible and open to change, growth and learning can occur. Learning about difference is an on-going developmental process that is explored throughout this course.

This is the capstone course for the leadership in student affairs concentration in the master's program in educational leadership. It integrates the coursework and experiences in to a systemic view of student affairs and higher education and the practitioner's role in optimizing the student learning experience. It focuses on strategies for influencing organizational culture in order to provide an enriched integrated learning experience for the college student.

9 credits required - any graduate level course approved by instructor.

TOTAL 42 Credits

80x72 image

Pam Boersig, M.Ed.

Dean of Student Affairs, Arts Institute International
Kate M. Boyle, Ph.D., is the Program Director of the Leadership in Student Affairs graduate program at the University of St. Thomas.

Kate (Kathleen) M. Boyle, Ph.D.

Associate Professor | Department Chair | Program Director: Leadership in Student Affairs Leadership, Policy and Administration (651) 962-4393
Office 409 | Opus Hall

80x72 image

Keith Edwards, Ph.D.

Director of Campus Life, Macalester College
John D. Holst, Ed.D., is an associate professor in the Leadership, Policy and Administration program at the University of St. Thomas.

John D. Holst, Ed.D.

Associate Professor Leadership, Policy and Administration (651) 962-4433
MOH 415 | Opus Hall

Sarah J. Noonan, Ed.D., is an associate professor in the Leadership, Policy and Administration program at the University of St. Thomas.

Sarah J. Noonan, Ed.D.

Associate Professor Leadership, Policy and Administration (651)962-4897
MOH 414 | Opus Hall

 
 

Assistantships and Internships
Through the Leadership in Student Affairs Assistantship and Internship opportunities, you will work alongside college or university student affairs staff at a variety of higher education institutions in the Twin Cities, which provide a diverse selection of professional experiences.
 
DepartmentCollege/University
Career Services Intern Minneapolis Community and Technical College
Recreational Services Graduate Intern Normandale Community College
Conduct Officer Century College
Civic Leadership Initiative Graduate Intern Minneapolis Campus Compact
Career Services Assistant Century College
Basketball Operations Graduate Intern University of St. Thomas
Conduct Intern Normandale Community College
Assessment Advising InternAssessment Advising Intern
Century College
 

The Value of a St. Thomas Degree

Calculating the cost of your degree can be challenging, as every institution approaches it a bit differently. At St. Thomas, we list our tuition cost as cost per credit:

  • Each course can be 1-3 semester credits, but the standard course is 3 credits.  
  • A part-time student in our graduate programs take 3-5 credits per term, a typical full-time student takes 6-9 credits per term.
  • To view the total number of credits per program you can view the courses tab above.

It may be possible for you to receive some type of financial assistance. To learn more, please visit our Graduate Financial Aid page.

We offer our students much more than just a degree. We offer the chance to be a part of a personal and professional network like no other, which means your graduate education will enrich your life and career long into the future.




Cost

Education (M.A., Ed.S., Certificate, Licensure)

On-campus Tuition (per credit) $793.50
Books and materials
(estimate per course)
$150-250
One-time application fee $50

1 | Meet the Requirements:

  • A Bachelor's Degree from an accredited institution.
  • A cumulative minimum undergraduate G.P.A. of 3.0 (4.0 scale) or the successful completion of a graduate level program from another institution.

If you do not meet the above requirement(s), you may be eligible for special admission, which requires:

  • A cumulative minimum undergraduate G.P.A. of 2.75 (4.0 scale).
  • The completion of a standardized test, such as the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), GRE, GMAT or LSAT
  • A possible interview with an admissions person/committee.

 2 | Submit the following application materials:

  • Application form and one-time $50 application fee.
  • Two positive letters of reference from non-related individuals.
  • Official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work (unless that work was completed at the University of St. Thomas).
  • Personal statement.

3 |  Submit the supplementary materials:

  • International Applicants:  (1) Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) required for any candidate whose primary language is not English. (2) Transcript Review: All international transcripts must be reviewed by an accredited evaluation service to determine U.S. equivalency of the degree awarded and the institution awarding the degree. Applications will not be reviewed for admissions until the official review is submitted.

Deadlines

Application Deadlines:

  • For Fall Term: June 1.
  • Preference given to early applicants.

When you can start

  • Fall semester begins September 3, 2014

Looking for More?

Apply online

© University of St. Thomas · Minnesota
1000 LaSalle Avenue · Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403 · USA
1-651-962-4550 · education@stthomas.edu