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International Leadership


Focusing on theory as it practically applies to real-world experience, this program explores the topics of international education, economic, health care and political development and underdevelopment, and the accompanying cross-cultural issues. Engaging, collaborative surroundings foster opportunities for you to build a professional network of colleagues who will become lifelong international leadership contacts. Whether through an intercultural exchange abroad or the International Leadership Forum, the International Leadership program offers you access to a world-wide network.  View our Information Session to learn more, and stay tuned for more information about our 2015 study abroad program in Tanzania. 

Where can I go with this degree? 

  • Nonprofit and non-governmental organizations, including UNICEF and the National Democratic Institute
  • Health care and service organizations, including the Peace Corps and the World Trade Organization
  • Foreign affairs organizations, including USAID and the US State Department
  • Business and economic organizations, including the World Bank, the World Trade Organization and those involved with micro-financing


What you can earn

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  • Certificate
  • Master of Arts (M.A.)

 

Where you'll learn

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  • On-campus (St. Thomas)

 

 

 

When you can start

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  • Fall semester begins: September 3, 2014

 

 



Questions about this program

GrossKlaus, Jackie 80x72

Jackie Grossklaus

Department Assistant

(651) 962-4885

jmgrossklaus@stthomas.edu


Program Details

For the Certificate

The course is designed to critically address theoretical underpinnings of development, underdevelopment and sustainable development at the global level with a focus on the Third World countries and Sub Sahara Africa. Class readings and discussions also integrate an interdisciplinary overview of factors that contribute to, or deprive from, lasting viability of economic, social as well as leadership development in the Third World.

The course is designed as a seminar and an exploration of leadership theories and practices as applied to the contexts of the Global South or Third World countries. This capstone course intends primarily to serve as an integrative seminar to assist students reflect on, synthesize and integrate what they have learned in their study of International Leadership. General theories will be applied to a selected region of the world suitable for student visit.

While this course explores methodologies employed in writing biographies and considers some of the criteria for judging the historical and artistic quality of biographies, it is primarily a course devoted to reading biographies and biographical portraits as a way of illuminating some of the dimensions of leadership, especially in education. Students read required texts and biographies of their own choosing. As a culminating activity, students write and share a biographical portrait for which they have done original research.

EDLD 800 Purposes and Contexts of Education (3 Credits)
This course examines the values that have shaped American education with a particular focus on ethics, equity, lifelong learning and global perspectives. Students reflect on the accomplishments and dilemmas of present educational systems in light of the past and decide on contributions they could make to improve its future.

EDLD 807 Foundations of Leadership: An Intellectual and Ethical Practice (3 Credits)
This course emphasizes the responsibility of educators to be attentive to the ethical aspects of relationships and decisions, including those made in the name of the institution. The need for an ethical commitment based on human worth and dignity is stressed. A case-study approach is used to surface ethical issues.

EDLD 861 Dialogue in Education (3 Credits)
This seminar employs classical sources and recent scholarship to explore the nature of dialogue. The view that dialogue is the foundation for all ethical discourse is examined, as well as the contention that dialogue is an important source of knowledge and understanding. Class discussion pays special attention to dialogues involving therapist and patient, ethnographer and native, teacher and student. Specially recommended for doctoral students interested in how people interact in a variety of organizations.

EDLD 862 Orality and Literacy (3 Credits)
Western societies have regarded literacy as indispensable for the participation of the citizen in cultural life. However, as technology becomes increasingly sophisticated and as we learn more about non-literate societies, our understanding of what it means to be literate has undergone significant change. This course examines the changing meaning of literacy and evaluates the ethical implications of writing in contrast to speaking and electronically processed information.

HRDO 622 International Human Resource and Change Leadership (3 Credits)
Culture is one of the key influences on all interactions of individuals and organizations in our globalizing world. Ability to analyze culture and understand cultural influences (whether it be culture of an organization or culture of another country) has become an important part of HR practitioners' toolkit. This course is intended to help you acquire knowledge and skills that will increase your intercultural competence, which is immensely important for HR practitioners and change leaders who deal with diverse population and different organizational cultures.

TOTAL 12 Credits

For the Master of Arts (M.A.)

This course begins the required three-course M.A. or Ed. S. research sequence. After an introductory overview of social research, it emphasizes historical and ethnographic approaches to thinking about collecting and analyzing information. Course activities provide an opportunity to experience doing research using historical and qualitative methods.

This course emphasizes the responsibility of educators to be attentive to the ethical aspects of relationships and decisions, including those made in the name of the institution. The need for an ethical commitment based on human worth and dignity is stressed. A case-study approach is used to surface ethical issues.

The course provides a comparative and cross-national analysis of development (including health care, education, politics and economy) and underdevelopment issues and the incidence of higher education in particular. The course subjects cover the interconnectedness of under/development and higher education with emphasis on political, cultural, social and economical impacts of education across countries and continents. Specifically, the course examines education, education systems in different countries, ideological and theoretical underpinnings, practical manifestations and key issues in a global and comparative context.

This course examines theories and practices of futurism through long term scenarios (including socio-political, educational and economic trends) of the Global South or less industrialized countries, using an interdisciplinary approach based upon a critical analysis of historical predictions. Theories of futurism will be examined through the lens of past projections of the future, both realized and failed over time, to enhance students' ability to critically engage in realistically long term vision.

While this course explores methodologies employed in writing biographies and considers some of the criteria for judging the historical and artistic quality of biographies, it is primarily a course devoted to reading biographies and biographical portraits as a way of illuminating some of the dimensions of leadership, especially in education. Students read required texts and biographies of their own choosing. As a culminating activity, students write and share a biographical portrait for which they have done original research.

In this course, major issues appropriate for research are assigned to individuals or teams; fieldwork and data collection culminating in the development of a policy proposal and implementation strategy are highlighted. Students, instructors and experts from the field participate in seminars dealing with the proposals.

The course is designed as a seminar and an exploration of leadership theories and practices as applied to the contexts of the Global South or Third World countries. This capstone course intends primarily to serve as an integrative seminar to assist students reflect on, synthesize and integrate what they have learned in their study of International Leadership. General theories will be applied to a selected region of the world suitable for student visit.

The course is designed to critically address theoretical underpinnings of development, underdevelopment and sustainable development at the global level with a focus on the Third World countries and Sub Sahara Africa. Class readings and discussions also integrate an interdisciplinary overview of factors that contribute to, or deprive from, lasting viability of economic, social as well as leadership development in the Third World.

This is a capstone course for the M.A. in Educational Leadership. It is designed for students to critically reflect upon and articulate his/her learning. Students examine cases through various frames, read leadership literature and evaluate his/her experience.

A student working with the faculty will design a program of elective study that enhances personal and professional growth. (Minimum six credits required; can take up to nine elective credits). 

TOTAL 31 Credits

Bongila, Jean-Pierre 80x72

Fr. Jean- Pierre Bongila, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor | Program Director: International Leadership Leadership, Policy and Administration (651) 962-4799
MOH 410 | Opus Hall

Fish, Thomas 80x72

Thomas L. Fish, Ed.D.

Professor Emeritus Leadership, Policy and Administration (651) 962-4436
MOH 413 | Opus Hall

Holst, John 80x72

John D. Holst, Ed.D.

Associate Professor Leadership, Policy and Administration (651) 962-4433
MOH 415 | Opus Hall

LaMagdeleine, Donald 80x72

Donald R. LaMagdeleine, Ph.D.

Professor | Department Chair Leadership, Policy and Administration (651) 962-4893
MOH 412 | Opus Hall

 
 

Intercultural Exchanges Abroad

The International Leadership program includes an intercultural exchange, a two-week travel experience to Global South countries. The trip offers the unique opportunity of understanding Global South's leadership and future development through the eyes of those who have been direct agents of change. Should a student not be able to travel, he or she will be able to complete alternate coursework with the program director's approval. Learn more about our Study Abroad Program in Tanzania and the accompanying Leadership in International Contexts of Tanzania (EDLD 869) coursework.

You can also view a video from the 2012 trip to Tanzania, a video from the International Leadership South African Immersion Program, or click through to learn more about previous opportunities: EDLD 869 in South Africa 2011 and EDLD 869 in Tanzania 2012.

 

International Leadership Forum

The International Leadership Forum hosts national leaders and international heads of states, including former democratically elected African leaders. The forum is designed to allow our students to benefit from their insights and leadership experience. Learn more about some of our previous forums: View a video of the Fall 2011 International Leadership Forum, or a video from the Spring 2012 International Leadership Forum.

 

Ongoing Professional Development

Whether networking with leaders in the area of policy reform, being inspired by change agents in microfinance or simply catching up on the latest qualitative research findings, annual events and conferences sponsored by the department of Leadership, Policy and Administration offer a variety of networking and professional development opportunities. Most events include continuing education units for a variety of professions.  

 

Community Partnerships

The International Leadership Program values engaging with and supporting the international communities and organizations in the Twin Cities Metro. In addition to hosting our annual, free international leadership forum, we will often provide sponsorship for events put on by local organizations. A few of these events include:

  • Iraqi Voices reception hosted by the Advocates for Human Rights and Iraqi + American Reconciliation Project. Iraqi authors and artists, and American veterans, had the chance to share their stories through art, film, and books.
  • Fourth Minnesota Cuban Film Festival. Thursdays, 7:00 p.m, February 21-March 28 at St. Anthony Main Theatre
  • Conference on the Role of Diaspora for Peace and Development in Ethiopia. Leaders from around the world will gather to discuss their role in resolving conflict in their home country.
 

The Value of a St. Thomas Degree

Calculating the cost of your degree can be challenging, as every institution approaches it a bit differently. At St. Thomas, we list our tuition cost as cost per credit:

  • Each course can be 1-3 semester credits, but the standard course is 3 credits.  
  • A typical part-time student in our graduate programs takes 3-6 credits per term.
  • To view the total number of credits per program you can view the courses tab above.

It may be possible for you to receive some type of financial assistance. To learn more, please visit our Graduate Financial Aid page.

We offer our students much more than just a degree. We offer the chance to be a part of a personal and professional network like no other, which means your graduate education will enrich your life and career long into the future.




Cost

Education (M.A., Ed.S., Certificate, Licensure)

On-campus Tuition (per credit) $793.50
Books and materials
(estimate per course)
$150-250
One-time application fee $50

1 | Meet the Requirements:

  • A bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution
  • A cumulative minimum undergraduate G.P.A. of 3.0 (4.0 scale) or the successful completion of a graduate level program from another institution

If you do not meet the above requirement(s), you may be eligible for special admission, which requires:

  • A cumulative minimum undergraduate G.P.A. of 2.75 (4.0 scale)
  • The completion of a standardized test, such as the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), GRE, GMAT or LSAT
  • A possible interview with an admissions person/committee

2 | Submit the following application materials:

  • Application form and one-time $50 application fee
  • Two positive letters of reference from non-related individuals
  • Official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work (unless that work was completed at the University of St. Thomas)
  • Personal statement

3 |  Submit the supplementary materials:

  • Initial Licensure:  MTLE Basic Skills required by the end of an initial teacher licensure candidate's first semester of coursework.
  • International Applicants:  (1) Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) required for any candidate whose primary language is not English. (2) Transcript Review: All international transcripts must be reviewed by an accredited evaluation service to determine U.S. equivalency of the degree awarded and the institution awarding the degree. Applications will not be reviewed for admissions until the official review is submitted.

Deadlines

Application Deadlines:

  • For Fall Term: June 1
  • For Spring Term: Rolling
  • For Summer Term: May 1

 

Looking for More?

Apply online

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