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Education Specialists develop leadership skills to implement and create successful administrative strategies for change.
Education Specialist


Education leaders today deal with rapidly changing environments and need to be able to collaborate with others to develop sound policies, listen well to and manage diverse points of view and think critically while acting ethically. Through this program, you will develop a strong foundation and understanding of leadership in education. These skills will help you analyze and implement sound administrative policy, create successful strategies for change and put into service leading practices for the day-to-day needs of your schools.

The Education Specialist in Educational Leadership degree is designed for busy working professionals. Classes are typically held one evening per week and occasional Saturdays. This program is designed for individuals with a master’s degree in educational leadership looking to fulfill required competencies for a K-12 Principal licensure, Superintendent licensure or Director of Special Education licensure.



What you can earn

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  • Education Specialist (Ed.S.)
  • Principal License
  • Superintendent License
  • Director of Special Education License

 

Where you'll learn

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  • Off-site (see locations below)

 

 

 

When you can start

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  • See locations tab (below) for upcoming cohorts

 



Questions about this program

Ea Porter is an Administrative Assistant for the Teacher Education program in the College of Education, Leadership and Counseling at the University of St. Thomas.

Ea Porter

Enrollment Advisor

651-962-4657

celc@stthomas.edu


Program Details

For the Principal Licensure

This course begins the required three-course M.A. or Ed.S. research sequence. After an introductory overview of social research, it emphasizes historical and ethnographic approaches to thinking about collecting and analyzing information. Course activities provide an opportunity to experience doing research using historical and qualitative methods.

This course is designed to accomplish three goals: analyze and pre-assess the student experiences in leadership in a critical manner, acquaint the student with the phenomenon of leadership and set professional goals. The means by which this analysis is undertaken is important to success in the course. The student will analytically and critically reflect upon his/her own capabilities in reference to specific leadership competencies.

This course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate the skills necessary to be an effective leader in a school setting.  The course begins with a day-long simulation activity, designed through a partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals.  An in-basket of requests and background information is the first task for the leader and includes opportunities to resolve complex problems and get results through the use of organizational skills.  Participants are also assessed on their ability to demonstrate sensitivity and use sound judgment in face-to-face meetings with actors playing the role of upset parent and under-performing teacher.  Team meetings are held, and participants also give a formal speech to a simulated board of education.  The work of each participant is rated by trained assessors and compiled into a Final Report showing strengths and weaknesses in 10 different areas of leadership skills.  Participants use this data to improve their ability to be an effective peer coach, department head, dean, assistant principal, principal or other building-based educational leader.  Follow-up activities in this course include setting Professional Growth Targets for improvement, and implementing them at the school level.

This course examines how educational organizations develop and change and how leaders and followers interact within organizations from several theoretical and conceptual perspectives. Students observe the workings of educational institutions and programs, interview educational leaders, and analyze their own understanding and practice of leadership.

This course focuses on the leader's role in promoting faculty and staff education and improvement within a climate of high expectations and mutual support. The supervision and staff development strategies presented are grounded in adult learning theory and current research on teaching. Students practice team building, goal setting, observing and conferencing skills.

 

This course emphasizes the responsibility of educators to be attentive to the ethical aspects of relationships and decisions, including those made in the name of the institution. The need for an ethical commitment based on human worth and dignity is stressed. A case-study approach is used to surface ethical issues.

Federal, state and local relationship of law to education are studied. Areas covered include school law as it pertains to districts, boards of education, and school personnel; contractual authority and tort liability; problems of employment of teachers; transportation, attendance and discipline; and landmark school law cases.

This course covers federal, state and local support of education; analysis of various revenue-raising alternatives; a study of the trends in receipts and expenditures for education; and the Minnesota financial accounting and reporting systems.

 

Students examine how special education, gifted education, counseling services and other programs serving students with special needs can be integrated into the total curriculum. The course deals with the philosophical, historical and political foundations of special programs as well as with curriculum coordination, staff development, fiscal planning and other practical operational issues. It also deals with the ethical issues involved in responding to diverse student needs.

This course examines the mission of the school and focuses on the attributes, knowledge and skills a person needs to be a principal. Emphasis is placed on the importance of ongoing education and the development of professional networks. Students have an opportunity to assess their skills as a basis for selecting elective courses appropriate to their needs. Recent national studies on elementary and secondary education are reviewed and an in-depth analysis of those issues relating to the secondary school occurs.

The professional portfolio is the synthesis of learning and accomplishments of the educational leadership licensure student. Students demonstrate knowledge, experience or expertise in each of the five comprehensive goals for the degree program. Students choose the content themselves and offer a rationale for that selection. Portfolios are presented in a group setting. Prerequisites: All degree requirements completed; permission of adviser.

The student is involved in a 250-hour internship experience with a licensed principal as an on-site supervisor and participates in a seminar with other interns. Interns are required to keep a reflective journal of experiences. The internship supervisor from the educational leadership program provides specific guidelines for the intern and the on-site supervisor. Refer to Internship Policies and Procedures (email soe_edlead@stthomas.edu to request a copy). Prerequisite: Adviser's signature.

TOTAL 31 Credits

For the Superintendent Licensure

This course begins the required three-course M.A. or Ed.S. research sequence. After an introductory overview of social research, it emphasizes historical and ethnographic approaches to thinking about collecting and analyzing information. Course activities provide an opportunity to experience doing research using historical and qualitative methods.

This course is designed to accomplish three goals: analyze and pre-assess the student experiences in leadership in a critical manner, acquaint the student with the phenomenon of leadership and set professional goals. The means by which this analysis is undertaken is important to success in the course. The student will analytically and critically reflect upon his/her own capabilities in reference to specific leadership competencies.

This course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate the skills necessary to be an effective leader in a school setting.  The course begins with a day-long simulation activity, designed through a partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals.  An in-basket of requests and background information is the first task for the leader and includes opportunities to resolve complex problems and get results through the use of organizational skills.  Participants are also assessed on their ability to demonstrate sensitivity and use sound judgment in face-to-face meetings with actors playing the role of upset parent and under-performing teacher.  Team meetings are held, and participants also give a formal speech to a simulated board of education.  The work of each participant is rated by trained assessors and compiled into a Final Report showing strengths and weaknesses in 10 different areas of leadership skills.  Participants use this data to improve their ability to be an effective peer coach, department head, dean, assistant principal, principal or other building-based educational leader.  Follow-up activities in this course include setting Professional Growth Targets for improvement, and implementing them at the school level.

This course examines how educational organizations develop and change and how leaders and followers interact within organizations from several theoretical and conceptual perspectives. Students observe the workings of educational institutions and programs, interview educational leaders, and analyze their own understanding and practice of leadership.

This course focuses on the leader's role in promoting faculty and staff education and improvement within a climate of high expectations and mutual support. The supervision and staff development strategies presented are grounded in adult learning theory and current research on teaching. Students practice team building, goal setting, observing and conferencing skills.

 

This course emphasizes the responsibility of educators to be attentive to the ethical aspects of relationships and decisions, including those made in the name of the institution. The need for an ethical commitment based on human worth and dignity is stressed. A case-study approach is used to surface ethical issues.

Federal, state and local relationship of law to education are studied. Areas covered include school law as it pertains to districts, boards of education, and school personnel; contractual authority and tort liability; problems of employment of teachers; transportation, attendance and discipline; and landmark school law cases.

This course covers federal, state and local support of education; analysis of various revenue-raising alternatives; a study of the trends in receipts and expenditures for education; and the Minnesota financial accounting and reporting systems.

 

Students examine how special education, gifted education, counseling services and other programs serving students with special needs can be integrated into the total curriculum. The course deals with the philosophical, historical and political foundations of special programs as well as with curriculum coordination, staff development, fiscal planning and other practical operational issues. It also deals with the ethical issues involved in responding to diverse student needs.

This course examines the mission of the school and focuses on the attributes, knowledge and skills a person needs to be a principal. Emphasis is placed on the importance of ongoing education and the development of professional networks. Students have an opportunity to assess their skills as a basis for selecting elective courses appropriate to their needs. Recent national studies on elementary and secondary education are reviewed and an in-depth analysis of those issues relating to the secondary school occurs.

The professional portfolio is the synthesis of learning and accomplishments of the educational leadership licensure student. Students demonstrate knowledge, experience or expertise in each of the five comprehensive goals for the degree program. Students choose the content themselves and offer a rationale for that selection. Portfolios are presented in a group setting. Prerequisites: All degree requirements completed; permission of adviser.

This course is designed to help students gain knowledge and experience related to the various roles and responsibilities of an area or district superintendent. Historical and current concepts of the superintendency along with various theories of executive leadership are examined. Students explore authentic issues and challenges in school leadership and acquire professional knowledge and skills by completing "field-based modules" related to the areas of superintendent leadership and responsibility. The following areas are incorporated into field-based modules: leadership and district culture; policy and governance; communications and community relations; organizational management; curriculum planning and development; instuctional management; human resource management; and values and ethics of leadership. The field- based modules incorporate the program requirements for superintendent licensure candidates as defined by Minnesota Rule 3512.0600. 

The student is involved in a 250-hour internship experience with a licensed principal as an on-site supervisor and participates in a seminar with other interns. Interns are required to keep a reflective journal of experiences. The internship supervisor from the educational leadership program provides specific guidelines for the intern and the on-site supervisor. Refer to Internship Policies and Procedures (email soe_edlead@stthomas.edu to request a copy). Prerequisite: Adviser's signature.

The professional portfolio is the synthesis of learning and accomplishments of the educational leadership licensure student. Students demonstrate knowledge, experience or expertise in each of the five comprehensive goals for the degree program. Students choose the content themselves and offer a rationale for that selection. Portfolios are presented in a group setting. Prerequisites: All degree requirements completed; permission of adviser.

The topics course is designed to assist students who have previously completed the EDLD 877 course, yet who need additional assistance in completing the portfolio.  Students in this course receive technical assistance in the development of their Superintendent Portfolio, to be presented to a Licensure Panel.  Students choose the artifacts from their previous professional work in education, as well as their work during their Clinical Practicum to enter into their portfolio.  Portfolios are presented in a group setting to panel members who represent the student's area of licensure.

TOTAL 38 Credits

For the Special Education Director License

This course begins the required three-course M.A. or Ed.S. research sequence. After an introductory overview of social research, it emphasizes historical and ethnographic approaches to thinking about collecting and analyzing information. Course activities provide an opportunity to experience doing research using historical and qualitative methods.

The purpose of this course is to develop leadership skills and competencies for those pursuing careers in the administration of special education programs. The course focuses on the most current competencies outlined by the Minnesota Board of School Administrators. Specific topics of focus in the course build on the core skills required for the Director of Special Education license and include: a) implementation of policy and law, b) organizational management, c) resource allocation.

This course is designed to accomplish three goals: analyze and pre-assess the student experiences in leadership in a critical manner, acquaint the student with the phenomenon of leadership and set professional goals. The means by which this analysis is undertaken is important to success in the course. The student will analytically and critically reflect upon his/her own capabilities in reference to specific leadership competencies.

This course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate the skills necessary to be an effective leader in a school setting.  The course begins with a day-long simulation activity, designed through a partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals.  An in-basket of requests and background information is the first task for the leader and includes opportunities to resolve complex problems and get results through the use of organizational skills.  Participants are also assessed on their ability to demonstrate sensitivity and use sound judgment in face-to-face meetings with actors playing the role of upset parent and under-performing teacher.  Team meetings are held, and participants also give a formal speech to a simulated board of education.  The work of each participant is rated by trained assessors and compiled into a Final Report showing strengths and weaknesses in 10 different areas of leadership skills.  Participants use this data to improve their ability to be an effective peer coach, department head, dean, assistant principal, principal or other building-based educational leader.  Follow-up activities in this course include setting Professional Growth Targets for improvement, and implementing them at the school level.

Minimum of 200 hours under the direct supervision of a director of special education. Experience is based on the competencies required for licensure. Culminates in a portfolio documenting the competencies for licensure as directed by the Special Education Department. Includes documentation of practical experiences gleaned from the student's licensure program. 

This course examines how educational organizations develop and change and how leaders and followers interact within organizations from several theoretical and conceptual perspectives. Students observe the workings of educational institutions and programs, interview educational leaders, and analyze their own understanding and practice of leadership.

This course focuses on the leader's role in promoting faculty and staff education and improvement within a climate of high expectations and mutual support. The supervision and staff development strategies presented are grounded in adult learning theory and current research on teaching. Students practice team building, goal setting, observing and conferencing skills.

 

This course emphasizes the responsibility of educators to be attentive to the ethical aspects of relationships and decisions, including those made in the name of the institution. The need for an ethical commitment based on human worth and dignity is stressed. A case-study approach is used to surface ethical issues.

This course focuses on the formal and informal processes for attaining MN licensure as Director of Special Education. Candidates are introduced to the competency-based licensure program and examine the relationship between Core licensure competencies in administrative licensure and the current licensure-specific competencies for Director. The licensure program is developed based on the candidate's individual knowledge and skills and candidates receive instruction in the design of the professional portfolio and production/ selection of appropriate documents for the licensure. 

*Based on the results of this assessment, candidates will be advised on which additional special education courses, if any, will need to be added to their Program of Studies leading to licensure as a Director of Special Education.

Federal, state and local relationship of law to education are studied. Areas covered include school law as it pertains to districts, boards of education, and school personnel; contractual authority and tort liability; problems of employment of teachers; transportation, attendance and discipline; and landmark school law cases.

This course covers federal, state and local support of education; analysis of various revenue-raising alternatives; a study of the trends in receipts and expenditures for education; and the Minnesota financial accounting and reporting systems.

 

Students examine how special education, gifted education, counseling services and other programs serving students with special needs can be integrated into the total curriculum. The course deals with the philosophical, historical and political foundations of special programs as well as with curriculum coordination, staff development, fiscal planning and other practical operational issues. It also deals with the ethical issues involved in responding to diverse student needs.

The professional portfolio is the synthesis of learning and accomplishments of the educational leadership licensure student. Students demonstrate knowledge, experience or expertise in each of the five comprehensive goals for the degree program. Students choose the content themselves and offer a rationale for that selection. Portfolios are presented in a group setting. Prerequisites: All degree requirements completed; permission of adviser.

TOTAL 32 Credits

Osseo, MN: Ed.S. w/ Principal Licensure, Fall 2014

Degree: Education Specialist (Ed.S) & K-12 Principal Licensure
Time: Wednesdays, 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.; 1 to 2 Saturdays per course, 8:30 a.m - 4:30 p.m
Start Date: Novenber 5, 2014
Location: Forum Room, District Service Center, 11200 93rd Avenue North, Maple Grove, MN 55369 (map)

Starting Fall 2014. Application Deadline: October 8, 2014

St. Paul: Ed.S. w/ Principal Licensure, Fall 2014

Degree: Education Specialist (Ed.S) & K-12 Principal Licensure
Time: Thursdays, 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.; 1 to 2 Saturdays per course, 8:30 a.m - 4:30 p.m
Start Date: November 13, 2014
Location: Cretin Derham Hall 550, South Albert St., St. Paul, MN 55116 (map)

Starting Fall 2014. Application Deadline: October 16, 2014

Lakeville, MN: Ed.S. Spring 2015

Degree: Education Specialist (Ed.S) & K-12 Principal Licensure
Time: Wednesdays, 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.; 1 to 2 Saturdays per course, 8:30 a.m - 4:30 p.m
Start Date: March 25, 2015
Location: Lakeville South High School, 21135 Jacquard Avenue Lakeville, MN 55044 (map)

Starting Spring 2015. Application Deadline: February 25, 2015

Dave W. Petersen, Ph.D., is an LPA Clinical Faculty member and a Charter School Liaison in the Leadership, Policy and Administration program at the University of St. Thomas.

Dave W. Peterson, Ph.D.

LPA Clinical Faculty/Charter School Liaison Leadership, Policy and Administration (651) 962-4844
MOH 428 | Opus Hall

 
 

Ongoing Professional Development

Annual events and conferences sponsored by the department offer a variety of networking and professional development opportunities.   

 

Real-world field experience

If your program includes a field experience element, the dedicated faculty and staff in your program will work with you to ensure that your experience will meet your interests and facilitate your growth, both personally and professionally. Throughout your time in your program, regularly scheduled meetings with faculty and peers offer the opportunity to form a strong professional network as you prepare to enter your field.

 

Community Partnerships

The College of Education, Leadership & Counseling takes pride in engaging in innovative partnerships with a variety of organizations. Students in the College of Education, Leadership & Counseling will find many opportunities for professional growth as a result of working with these organizations. Partnership examples include the Northwest Suburban Integration District, Center for Academics and Sports, FAIR School and the Collaborative Urban Educators program.

 

The Value of a St. Thomas Degree

We offer our students much more than just a degree. We offer the chance to be a part of a personal and professional network like no other, which means your graduate education will enrich your life and career long into the future.

Calculating the cost of your degree can be challenging, as every institution approaches it a bit differently. At St. Thomas, we list our tuition cost as cost per credit:

  • Each course can be 1-3 semester credits, but the standard course is 3 credits.  
  • To view the total number of credits per program you can view the courses tab above.

It may be possible for you to receive some type of financial assistance. To learn more, please visit our Graduate Financial Aid page.




Cost

Education (M.A., Ed.S., Certificate, Licensure)

On-campus Tuition (per credit) $793.50
Off-site Program Tuition (per credit) $415
Books and materials
(estimate per course)
$150-250
One-time application fee $50


1 | Meet the basic requirements:

  • A Master's degree from a regionally accredited institution.
  • A cumulative minimum undergraduate G.P.A. of 3.25 (4.0 scale) or the successful completion of a graduate level program from another institution

If you do not meet the above requirement(s), you may be eligible for special admission, which requires:

  • A cumulative minimum undergraduate G.P.A. of 2.75 (4.0 scale).
  • The completion of a standardized test, such as the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), GRE, GMAT or LSAT
  • A possible interview with an admissions person/committee.

2 |  Meet the supplementary requirements:

  • MTLE Basic Skills required for any candidate being admitted into an initial teacher licensure program. 
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) required for any candidate whose primary language is not English.

3 |  Submit the following application materials:

  • Application form and one-time $50 application fee.
  • Two positive letters of reference from non-related individuals.
  • Official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work (unless that  work was completed at the University of St. Thomas).
  • Personal statement.

Deadlines

Application Deadlines:

  • For Fall Term: June 1
  • For Spring Term: November 1
  • For Summer Term: May 1

When you can start

  • See locations tab for upcoming cohorts

Looking for More?

Apply online

© University of St. Thomas · Minnesota
1000 LaSalle Avenue · Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403 · USA
1-651-962-4550 · education@stthomas.edu