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Counseling Psychology M.A. graduates are prepared for licensure to work as a professional counselor or in a variety of career paths.
Counseling Psychology M.A.


Our ‌Counseling Psychology MA provides students with a firm foundation of psychological theories and practical counseling techniques and opportunities for a variety of career paths after graduation. The MA Program meets the educational requirements for licensure* as professional counselors (LPC and LPCC). In addition to coursework, the program requires each student to complete a practicum.  A variety of practicum sites are available, including the Interprofessional Center for Counseling and Legal Services. Learn about our M.A. with Direct Admission to the Psy.D.

A student in the M.A. Degree Program in Counseling Psychology is:

  • Assigned a core faculty advisor and taught by core and adjunct faculty who provide a wide array of counseling services to clients
  • Able to develop a flexible plan of study taking evening and weekend courses
  • Connected to a strong network of diverse students, faculty, and alumni
  • Prepared for a career in counseling through our M.A. Practicum and Internship Experience
 
*While the course work in the M.A. Counseling Psychology program is consistent with material tested on state and national licensing exams, applicants are strongly encouraged to research the field and be aware of licensing requirements and employment options.


What you can earn

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Where you'll learn

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  • On-campus (Minneapolis)

 

 

 

When you can start

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  • Spring or Fall term

 



 



Questions about this program

Laurie DuPont is the Program Coordinator for the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Laurie Dupont

Program Coordinator

651-962-4650

gradpsych@stthomas.edu


Counseling Psychology Program Details

For the Master of Arts (M.A.)

Descriptive and inferential statistics; research models; introduction to research design.

Theoretical approaches to learning and change within the counseling process. Emphasis on both theory and corresponding technical approaches to change behavior.

Theoretical models in group psychology, including group process, group dynamics, systems theory, group behavior, systems approaches to group behavior; defense mechanisms in group behavior; group leadership; task-oriented group experience.

Measurement theory, reliability, validity, test construction, and ethical and legal considerations. Theoretical constructs of various types of psychometric instruments, including aptitude, achievement, intelligence, interest, and personality. Prerequisite: CPSY 600

Career Assessment. Comparative theories of career choice and career development. Occupational and environmental analysis techniques. Experience in the use of occupational information and career models. Problem identification for career issues and implications for other major life issues. Prerequisite: CPSY 600 recommended.

Role playing and simulation of specific counseling techniques (in contrast to counseling theories). Peer and self-evaluation techniques.

Professional ethics, professional standards of care, professional responsibilities, ethical decision-making, and current ethical and legal issues relating to role responsibilities.

Experience in individual and/or group counseling under faculty supervision in an approved setting. Seminar meetings for supervision, instruction, and discussion. Assignments include submission of audio- or video-taped counseling sessions, delivery of case presentations, and written self-evaluations. This course is the first of three consecutive courses that entail the practicum sequence (CPSY 608, 609 & 610) the cumulative requirement entails 700 hours of on-site activity at a minimum of 20 hours per week for at least 30 weeks.

Experience in individual and/or group counseling under faculty supervision in an approved setting. Seminar meetings for supervision, instruction, and discussion. Assignments include submission of audio-or video-taped counseling sessions, delivery of case presentations, and written self-evaluations and final integrative seminar paper. This course is the second of three consecutive courses that entail the practicum sequence (CPSY 608, 609 & 610): the cumulative requirement entails 700 hours of on-site activity at a minimum of 20 hours per week for at least 30 weeks.

Experience in individual and/or group counseling under faculty supervision in an approved setting. Seminar meetings for supervision, instruction, and discussion. Assignments include submission of audio-or video-taped counseling sessions, delivery of case presentations, and written self-evaluations and final integrative seminar paper. This course is the Third of three consecutive courses that entail the practicum sequence (CPSY 608, 609 & 610): the cumulative requirement entails 700 hours of on-site activity at a minimum of 20 hours per week for at least 30 weeks.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major counseling and personality theories. Major theories of personality and counseling will be explored including: psychoanalytic, existential, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral, constructivist, and family systems. Important emerging theories including constructivist, feminist and multicultural approaches will be examined as well. The course is intended to provide both theoretical explanations for human behavior and the counseling interventions derived from the theory.

Examination of stages of development and relationship between developmental stages and appropriate therapeutic intervention.  Course includes childhood, adolescence, adulthood and family development.

Examination of human physiological functioning in relation to behavior. Special focus on neuroanatomy and psychopharmacology.

Models for the understanding of behavior disorders, including DSM-IV diagnoses and terminology, and approaches to interventions.

Overview of marriage and family counseling, including application of family psychological theory to family problem solution. Intervention strategies based on family psychology theory.

Counseling with cultural differences, family concepts, traditions of multicultural perspective, ethnic concerns, and approaches to therapy based on cultural differences

This course will expose the student to various models for understanding behavior disorders in childhood and adolescence, including DSM-IV diagnoses and terminology, and approaches to assessment, treatment planning, and interventions with an emplasis on review of the empirical literature pertaining to the treatment of specific psychopathological states in childhood and adolescence.

TOTAL 48 Credits

Timothy W. Balke, Ph.D., is the Director of M.A. and Certificate programs in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Timothy W. Balke, Ph.D.

Director of MA and Certificate Programs Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4641
MOH 445J, Opus Hall

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Jean M. Birbilis, Ph.D., L.P., B.C.B.

Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4654
MOH 451D | Opus Hall

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Consuelo Cavalieri, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4678
MOH 451C | Opus Hall

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Bryana H. French, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4632
MOH 541B | Opus Hall

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Kurt Gehlert, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4656
MOH 445F | Opus Hall

Len Jennings, Ph.D., is a professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Len Jennings, Ph.D.

Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4652
MOH 445E | Opus Hall

Nathaniel William Nelson, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Nathaniel William Nelson, Ph.D.

Associate Professor | Clinical Psychologist Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4671
MOH 451C | Opus Hall

Tatyana Avdeyeva, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Tatyana Ramirez, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4658
MOH 445D | Opus Hall

Salina Renninger, Ph.D., is the Director of Training of Doctoral Students for the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Salina Renninger, Ph.D.

Director of Training: GSPP Doctoral Students Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4983
MOH 445K | Opus Hall

Patricia Stankovitch, Psy.D., is the Director of Psychological Services for the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Patricia Stankovitch, Psy.D.

Director of Psychological Services, Clinical Faculty Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4816
IPC 100 |Opus Hall

Christopher Vye, Ph.D., is the Chair of the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Christopher Vye, Ph.D.

Chair Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4666
MOH 234 | Opus Hall

 
 

Study Abroad
The Singapore J-Term study abroad course takes an existing course (CPsy 680, Diversity Issues in Counseling) and adds an intensely experiential component by traveling, living, and learning in the highly diverse, Southeast Asian country of Singapore. This exciting course consists of joint experiential learning exercises with Singaporean MA counseling students as well as site visits that illustrate the various ways mental health needs are addressed in Singapore (Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shamans, western trained psychotherapists, etc.). The opportunity to plunge into a cultural setting that is highly diverse with multiple languages (Mandarin, Malay, Tamil, and English), multiple religions (Islam, Taoism, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism), and multiple ethnicities (Chinese, Malay, Indian, ex-pat) makes for an unbelievable backdrop for a course on diversity.
 

The Interprofessional Center for Counseling and Legal Services

The Interprofessional Center offers psychological services to a diverse population of clients with mental health issues, while providing both practicum experiences and a pre-doctoral internship for graduate professional psychology students.  At the IPC, students strive to meet the needs of underserved people while gaining valuable real-world experience.  Our clients are low-income, uninsured or underinsured, individuals who often are unable to obtain psychological services if it were not for clinics like the IPC.  Services provided to clients (all free of charge) can include: individual counseling, group counseling, couples/family counseling, DBT (both skills group and therapy), psychological testing and/or psycho-education.  In addition, students may have the opportunity to periodically work on cases which are shared between Psychological Services and Social Work, Psychological Services and Law, or among all three of the disciplines at the IPC. 

 

Graduate Student Organization

The University of St. Thomas, Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP) Graduate Student Organization (GSO) is student-led organization founded with the purpose of enhancing the experiences and development of graduate psychology students within the University of St. Thomas. The GSPP GSO unites Masters and Doctoral-level graduate psychology students in the University of St. Thomas GSPP, for the purpose of professional and personal student development, the betterment of the department, and in their contributions to the field and community. The GSO strives to enhance the experiences and development of graduate psychology students within the University of St. Thomas through: representing and unifying GSPP graduate students at all levels, advancing their professional and personal interests, providing a forum for student discussion of psychology-relevant topics, and promoting graduate student participation in university and community affairs.

 

The Value of a St. Thomas Degree

Calculating the cost of your degree can be challenging, as every institution approaches it a bit differently. At St. Thomas, we list our tuition cost as cost per credit:

  • Each course can be 1-3 semester credits, but the standard course is 3 credits.  
  • A typical student in our graduate programs take 3-9 credits per term.
  • To view the total number of credits per program you can view the courses tab above.

It may be possible for you to receive some type of financial assistance. To learn more, please visit our Graduate Financial Aid page.

We offer our students much more than just a degree. We offer the chance to be a part of a personal and professional network like no other, which means your graduate education will enrich your life and career long into the future.




Cost

Counseling Psychology (M.A) & (PsyD)

On-campus Tuition (per credit) $760/$982
Books and materials
(estimate per course)
$150-250
One-time application fee $50

1 | Meet the basic requirements:

  • Prospective students must have completed an undergraduate degree from a college or university accredited by a regional accrediting agency
  • An undergraduate degree in psychology is not required.

2 |  Meet the supplementary requirements:

  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) required for any candidate whose primary language is not English.

3 |  Submit the following application materials:

  • Completed application form
  • One time application $50.00 fee
  • Official copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts
  • Three letters of recommendation, addressing the candidate's suitability for the program. Download the Counseling Recommendation Form.
  • Graduate Record Exam (school code: R6110) score (within the last 5 years)
  • Candidate's statement of purpose (part of the application form)
  • Two to three pages (double space) of scholarly writing related to the field of psychology
  • Resume/CV

4 |  Complete interview with Faculty upon selection as finalist

Deadlines

Application Deadlines:

  •  January 5th

When you can start

  • Fall term

Looking for More?

Apply online

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1000 LaSalle Avenue · Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403 · USA
1-651-962-4550 · education@stthomas.edu