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Counseling Psychology Doctorate (Psy.D.) graduates are prepared for licensure to work in a variety of clinical services.
Doctorate (Psy.D.) in Counseling Psychology


The Counseling Psychology Doctorate (Psy.D.) is designed to build on previous training in psychology and prepare professionals for a variety of work settings. Graduates typically pursue licensure for the practice of psychology and engage in a variety of clinical services including counseling, psychotherapy, assessment, supervision, administration, teaching and evaluation. For information about our M.A. with Direct Admission to the Psy.D, contact us. Student Admissions, Outcomes and Other Data‌‎‌‎ ‌‎‌‎

In this program, you will:
  • Establish competence in the core foundational areas associated with scientific psychology and in the foundations of practice associated with the specialty of counseling psychology
  • Demonstrate competence in diagnosing or defining problems through assessment and implementing effective intervention strategies
  • Identify and understand individual and cultural differences
  • Exhibit ethical knowledge and decision-making
  • Be prepared for a career in counseling through our Psy.D. Practicum and Internship Experience‌‎‌
 
In 1973, the American Psychological Association (APA) endorsed the Psy.D. as an appropriate model degree for professional service providers. In October of 2000, the Psy.D. at the University of St. Thomas’ Graduate School of Professional Psychology was accredited by the APA, Commission on Accreditation, 750 First St., N.E., Washington, DC 20002-4242. (202) 336-5979; TDD (202) 336-6123. 


What you can earn

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  • Doctorate (Psy.D.)
  • Master of Arts (M.A.) with Direct Admission to the Psy.D (Contact us)

 

Where you'll learn

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  • On-campus (St. Thomas)

 

 

 

When you can start

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  • Fall semester begins: September 3, 2014, with the recommendation to take one doctoral course in the summer prior to the fall term


Questions about this program

Laurie DuPont is the Program Coordinator for the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Laurie Dupont

Department Assistant

651-962-4650

gradpsych@stthomas.edu


Program Details

Year I

Course is designed as a doctoral course in career theories and career development, including career choice, assessment tools, and career counseling, along with organizational consultation within the work place.

An introduction to the criteria and processes required for organizing scholarly studies in professional psychology. The structures, procedures and resources for developing a doctoral project will be outlined. The course emphasizes relevant questions, problems and topics to pursue as possible counseling psychology doctoral projects.

A survey of diverse qualitative methods of inquiry applicable to the study of professional psychology. The course includes examination of examples of qualitative research in professional psychology and critical review of qualitative research designs. Students will develop a written and oral qualitative research proposal.

Course is designed to teach administration, scoring, interpretation of standardized individual mental tests. These instruments include, but are not limited to, the WAIS-R and WISC-III. Students receive a review of psychometrics.  The impact of culture on test results, methods of incorporating cognitive test results into psychological reports, and ethical issues pertaining to cognitive assessment will be examined. Students will gain experience administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment instruments under faculty supervision.

This course explores the historical background, context, and foundations for the practice of counseling psychology. Historical and philosophical roots of modern psychology are traced and linked to application in contemporary counseling psychology. Topics include the history of counseling psychology as a profession, history of counseling/psychotherapy approaches and theories, and important debates and controversies in scientific psychology.

Diagnosis and treatment of behavior disorders, with special emphasis on treatment planning regarding affective, anxiety, and personality disorders. Ethical considerations in use of medical model nomenclature.

A survey of quantitative methods of inquiry in psychology. Emphases on application of statistical techniques and critical review of quantitative research designs. Includes review of psychometric theory and discussion of mental health outcome evaluation methods.

Course explores the theoretical bases of personality assessment as well as the use of psychological instruments in the assessment of personality traits and characteristics. Students receive a review of psychometrics.  These instruments include, but are not limited to CPI, MMPI-II, and MCMI. The impact of culture on personality assessment, methods of incorporating personality test results into psychological reports, and ethical issues pertaining to personality assessment will be examined. Students will gain experience administering, scoring and interpreting frequently used personality assessment instruments under faculty supervision.

Year I Total 24 Credits

Year II

In consultation with an academic advisor, student will select an elective course from current program offerings.

This course examines human physiological functioning in relation to behavior.  In particular, mechanisms of neurotransmission, neuroanatomy, psychopharmacology, and brain pathology pertaining to neurological and psychiatric disorders are explored.

Supervised experience in counseling psychology within an appropriate approved setting. Student receives supervision and consultation throughout the experience. Faculty and student design practicum to complement student's career goals and previous counseling experience. Weekly faculty consultation is provided in Practice Development Seminar (CPSY 910 and CPSY 911) in which students are required to be concurrently registered

Professional development seminar is designed to provide supervision and consultation for practicum experience along with discussion of assessment and intervention strategies and professional responsibilities as a counseling psychologist. Topics examined through the consultation process include: peer supervision; utilization of self; counseling/psychotherapy process; assessment and intervention strategies; quality assurance, legal and ethical considerations; and culturally diverse counseling intervention. Course requires concurrent registration with CPSY 708, Doctoral Practicum.

An exploration of the theoretical foundations, practical strategies, and techniques of various contemporary approaches to psychotherapy; ethical considerations in contemporary therapy.

Supervised experience in counseling psychology within an appropriate approved setting. Student receives supervision and consultation throughout the experience. Faculty and student design practicum to complement student's career goals and previous counseling experience. Weekly faculty consultation is provided in Practice Development Seminar (CPSY 910 and CPSY 911) in which students are required to be concurrently registered

The relationship counseling course will focus on techniques of relationship therapy intervention including dysfunctional communication patterns, pathological relationship patterns, structured and unstructured relationship building exercises, factors contributing to relationship problems, and cultural and ethical considerations in relationship therapy.

Supervised experience in counseling psychology within an appropriate approved setting. Student receives supervision and consultation throughout the experience. Faculty and student design practicum to complement student's career goals and previous counseling experience. Weekly faculty consultation is provided in Practice Development Seminar (CPSY 910 and CPSY 911) in which students are required to be concurrently registered.

Professional development seminar is designed to provide supervision and consultation for practicum experience along with discussion of assessment and intervention strategies and professional responsibilities as a counseling psychologist. Topics examined through the consultation process are: counseling/ psychotherapy procedures, ethical and legal concerns with intervention; peer supervision; theoretical basis of intervention; quality assurance; and integration of self, process, and theory. Course requires concurrent registration with CPSY 708 Doctoral Practicum.

Ethical standards and rules of conduct in professional psychology. Current issues relating to ethical and professional behavior in psychology.

Year II Total 24 Credits

Year III

Examination of stages of development and relationship between developmental stages and appropriate therapeutic intervention. Course includes childhood, adolescence, adulthood and family development.

Principles of learning (classical, operant conditioning, social learning). Exploration of theoretical framework of human cognition. Conceptual structures of short- and long-term memory, and theories of emotion in the context of contemporary neuroscience.

The Doctor of Psychology degree (Psy.D.) requires completion of a doctoral project demonstrating a student's ability to assess, critically evaluate, and integrate knowledge gained from research, theoretical, and clinical sources regarding a topic of interest. The project consists of a critical, scholarly literature review section followed by a section which discusses issues related to implications, and culminates in a written document and oral presentation.  Registration may be for 1 credit hour during three consecutive terms or for a maximum of three hours during a single term. Three hours maximum.

Theoretical review of social and group processes and interactions. Integration of selected principles from social psychology, social influence, social learning, social anxiety, social cognition, self-efficacy, attitude change, prejudice with models of group behavior.

Theoretical models of therapy supervision, including examination of current theory and research. Current and historical models of consultation.  Practice in and assessment of individual clinical supervision skills.

Supervised experience in counseling psychology activities designed to enable students to develop additional doctoral level competencies (e.g., assessment, teaching, consultation, supervision, therapy with specific population, etc.) not available to them in CPSY 708. Weekly faculty consultation is provided.

The Doctor of Psychology degree (Psy.D.) requires completion of a doctoral project demonstrating a student's ability to assess, critically evaluate, and integrate knowledge gained from research, theoretical, and clinical sources regarding a topic of interest. The project consists of a critical, scholarly literature review section followed by a section which discusses issues related to implications, and culminates in a written document and oral presentation.  Registration may be for 1 credit hour during three consecutive terms or for a maximum of three hours during a single term. Three hours maximum.

Supervised experience in counseling psychology activities designed to enable students to develop additional doctoral level competencies (e.g., assessment, teaching, consultation, supervision, therapy with specific population, etc.) not available to them in CPSY 708. Weekly faculty consultation is provided.

This course is designed as a seminar focusing on current professional issues in counseling psychology, the use of self as the instrument of counseling/therapy, and the professional growth of the counseling psychologist as a life-long process.

Course focuses on training counselors and psychologists in cultural-relevant counseling skills. Two concerns relevant to any multicultural preparation are discussed and analyzed: 1) the influence of cultural diversity on counseling intervention and 2) developmental aspects and issues specific to individual culture and gender concerns.

Supervised experience in counseling psychology activities designed to enable students to develop additional doctoral level competencies (e.g., assessment, teaching, consultation, supervision, therapy with specific population, etc.) not available to them in CPSY 708. Weekly faculty consultation is provided.

The Doctor of Psychology degree (Psy.D.) requires completion of a doctoral project demonstrating a student's ability to assess, critically evaluate, and integrate knowledge gained from research, theoretical, and clinical sources regarding a topic of interest. The project consists of a critical, scholarly literature review section followed by a section which discusses issues related to implications, and culminates in a written document and oral presentation.  Registration may be for 1 credit hour during three consecutive terms or for a maximum of three hours during a single term. Three hours maximum.

Year III Total 24 Credits

Year IV

Supervised practice of counseling psychology congruent with professional standards. A 2,000-hour internship is required to be completed within 24 months. Students can complete the internship over 12 months during the fourth year or up to 24 months during the fourth and fifth years.

Supervised practice of counseling psychology congruent with professional standards. A 2,000-hour internship is required to be completed within 24 months. Students can complete the internship over 12 months during the fourth year or up to 24 months during the fourth and fifth years.

Supervised practice of counseling psychology congruent with professional standards. A 2,000-hour internship is required to be completed within 24 months. Students can complete the internship over 12 months during the fourth year or up to 24 months during the fourth and fifth years.

Year IV Total 9 Credits

Tatyana Avdeyeva, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Tatyana Avdeyeva, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4658
MOH 445D | Opus Hall

Timothy W. Balke, Ph.D., is the Director of M.A. and Certificate programs in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Timothy W. Balke, Ph.D.

Director of MA and Certificate Programs Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4641
MOH 445J, Opus Hall

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Jean M. Birbilis, Ph.D., L.P., B.C.B.

Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4654
MOH 451D | Opus Hall

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James P. Burns, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4653
MOH 451A | Opus Hall

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Consuelo Cavalieri, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4678
MOH 451C | Opus Hall

Kerry D. Frank, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Kerry D. Frank, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4839
MOH 451B | Opus Hall

Kurt Gehlert, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Kurt Gehlert, Ph.D.

Associate Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4656
MOH 445F | Opus Hall

Len Jennings, Ph.D., is a professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Len Jennings, Ph.D.

Professor Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4652
MOH 445E | Opus Hall

Nathaniel William Nelson, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Nathaniel William Nelson, Ph.D.

Associate Professor | Clinical Psychologist Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4671
MOH 451C | Opus Hall

Salina Renninger, Ph.D., is the Director of Training of Doctoral Students for the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Salina Renninger, Ph.D.

Director of Training: GSPP Doctoral Students Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4983
MOH 445K | Opus Hall

Patricia Stankovitch, Psy.D., is the Director of Psychological Services for the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Patricia Stankovitch, Psy.D.

Director of Psychological Services, Clinical Faculty Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4816
IPC 100 |Opus Hall

Christopher Vye, Ph.D., is the Chair of the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of St. Thomas.

Christopher Vye, Ph.D.

Chair Graduate School of Professional Psychology (651) 962-4666
MOH 234 | Opus Hall

 
 

Study Abroad
The Singapore J-Term study abroad course takes an existing course (CPSY 680, Diversity Issues in Counseling) and adds an intensely experiential component by traveling, living, and learning in the highly diverse, Southeast Asian country of Singapore. This exciting course consists of joint experiential learning exercises with Singaporean MA counseling students as well as site visits that illustrate the various ways mental health needs are addressed in Singapore (Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shamans, western trained psychotherapists, etc.). The opportunity to plunge into a cultural setting that is highly diverse with multiple languages (Mandarin, Malay, Tamil, and English), multiple religions (Islam, Taoism, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism), and multiple ethnicities (Chinese, Malay, Indian, ex-pat) makes for an unbelievable backdrop for a course on diversity.
 

The Interprofessional Center for Counseling and Legal Services

The Interprofessional Center offers psychological services to a diverse population of clients with mental health issues, while providing both practicum experiences and a pre-doctoral internship for graduate professional psychology students.  At the IPC, students strive to meet the needs of underserved people while gaining valuable real-world experience.  Our clients are low-income, uninsured or underinsured, individuals who often are unable to obtain psychological services if it were not for clinics like the IPC.  Services provided to clients (all free of charge) can include: individual counseling, group counseling, couples/family counseling, DBT (both skills group and therapy), psychological testing and/or psycho-education.  In addition, students may have the opportunity to periodically work on cases which are shared between Psychological Services and Social Work, Psychological Services and Law, or among all three of the disciplines at the IPC. 

 

Graduate Student Organization

The University of St. Thomas, Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP) Graduate Student Organization (GSO) is student-led organization founded with the purpose of enhancing the experiences and development of graduate psychology students within the University of St. Thomas. The GSPP GSO unites Masters and Doctoral-level graduate psychology students in the University of St. Thomas GSPP, for the purpose of professional and personal student development, the betterment of the department, and in their contributions to the field and community. The GSO strives to enhance the experiences and development of graduate psychology students within the University of St. Thomas through: representing and unifying GSPP graduate students at all levels, advancing their professional and personal interests, providing a forum for student discussion of psychology-relevant topics, and promoting graduate student participation in university and community affairs.

 

The Value of a St. Thomas Degree

Calculating the cost of your degree can be challenging, as every institution approaches it a bit differently. At St. Thomas, we list our tuition cost as cost per credit:

  • Each course can be 1-3 semester credits, but the standard course is 3 credits.  
  • A typical student in our graduate programs takes 6-9 credits per term.
  • To view the total number of credits per program you can view the courses tab above.

It may be possible for you to receive some type of financial assistance. To learn more, please visit our Graduate Financial Aid page.

We offer our students much more than just a degree. We offer the chance to be a part of a personal and professional network like no other, which means your graduate education will enrich your life and career long into the future.

Please note: In our Counseling Psychology Doctorate program, our 9-credit CPSY 800 course is priced at a cost of 3 credits.




Cost

Counseling Psychology (Psy.D.)

On-campus Tuition (per credit) $982
Books and materials (estimate per course) $150-250
One-time application fee $50

1 | Meet the basic requirements:

  • A master's degree in counseling psychology, or its equivalent. The degree must have been awarded by a regionally accredited institution of higher education.
  • Degrees may be considered equivalent if they include: 1) a counseling practicum and 2) courses in the following areas: statistics or quantitative research design, biological bases of behavior  (e.g., Psychobiology, Psychophysiology), social psychology or group dynamics, psychological assessment or measurement theory, personality or counseling theory, development (i.e., career, family, or life span), psychopathology, counseling skills and techniques, counseling ethics.

2 |  Meet the supplementary requirements:

  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) required for any candidate whose primary language is not English.

3 |  Submit the following application materials:

  • Completed application forms and $50.00 fee.
  • One official copy of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts.
  • Two letters of recommendation addressing the candidate's suitability for the program. Download the Counseling Recommendation Form.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score (school code: R6110); department code: 2005. Test scores obtained within the previous 5 years will be accepted. 
  • Candidate's statement of purpose - part of the application form. 
  • Writing Sample - 2-3 pages of scholarly writing related to the field of psychology.

4 |  Complete interview with Faculty upon selection as finalist

For the M.A. with Direct Admission to the Psy.D:

  • Students in the Direct Admission program complete the same requirements for our M.A. degree but are guaranteed admission to our doctoral program, pending successful completion of program requirements. The M.A. with Direct Admission to the Psy.D has additional application requirements. If you are interested in this degree track, please contact us.

Deadlines

Application Deadlines:

  • For Summer/Fall Term: January 5 

When you can start

  • Fall semester begins September 3, 2014, with the recommendation to take one doctoral course in the summer prior to the fall term

Looking for More?

Apply online

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