Summer 2016 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2016 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 101 - 02 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

41385 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David N. Foote

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - 04 The Search for Happiness - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

42131 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 201 - 01 Path/Expres/Pract in Cath Spir - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

40928 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David P. Deavel

This course provides an investigation into the various forms and expressions of spirituality which derive their inspiration from a common origin in Christian Revelation and the teachings of the Catholic Church. We will examine in depth a selection of topics and themes having to do with differing expressions and practices of Catholic spirituality across a number of historical eras and cultures. Possible topics include prayer and contemplation; the varieties of lay and religious spiritualities in both their solitary and communal dimensions; virtue; and vocation and work. Interdisciplinary course materials will draw on sources in theology, philosophy, history, literature, and art or music.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 222 - W01 Catholic Literary Tradition M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

42835 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann M. Klein

In the fall of 2016, students in The Catholic Literary Tradition course will explore how past and present Catholic authors illuminate aspects of the Beatitudes, our path toward ultimate happiness. We will begin the course in the same way one makes a journey: by considering the final destination before addressing the best means of reaching it. At the time of Mother Teresa’s canonization, we will read about our call to final beatitude in A Revolution of Love: The Meaning of Mother Teresa. After being introduced to each beatitude through an exemplary sonnet, we will discuss the beatitude on poverty when reading St. Thomas More’s Utopia, on meekness when reading Ron Hansen’s Exiles about Gerard Manley Hopkins, on righteousness when reading about the evangelization of the Southwest in Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop, on mourning when watching The Tree of Life, on mercy when viewing a brief documentary on St. Maria Goretti, on purity when reading Karl Wyotyla’s play The Jeweler’s Shop, on peace when reading the letters of Ruth Pakaluk who converted at Harvard and worked for pro-life, and on persecution when reading The Price to Pay about the recent conversion of a Muslim to Catholicism. The seminar not only offers you the opportunity to engage your imagination, mind, and heart as you read and analyze diverse genre—dialogue, autobiography, novel, play, letters, and poetry—but also empowers you to contribute creatively to the Catholic literary tradition by writing a sonnet of your own on one of the beatitudes. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 234 - 01 Love, Sex, & Friendship M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 210

Course Registration Number:

41381 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Stephen J. Heaney

A philosophical examination of the nature of human love. Possible topics include reciprocity and permanence, fidelity, romantic love, human sexuality, kinds of friendship. Special attention will be given to the thought of John Paul II. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 240 - 01 Faith and Doubt M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 208

Course Registration Number:

43146 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael W. Rota

Philosophical arguments for and against the possibility of divine revelation. Special attention will be given to the claim that the faith of the Catholic Church is revealed. Possible topics include tests of alleged revelations and miracles, evil as a barrier to belief in revelatory claims, the compatibility of science and religion, the role of reason and faith in religious commitment, and personal decision-making in a state of doubt about evidence. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

41124 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann M. Klein

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D02 The Catholic Vision M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 55S B10

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

40926 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ann M. Klein

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 306 - L01 Christ Faith & Mgmt Profesn - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

41382 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John F. McVea, Michael J. Naughton

What is a good manager and how does he or she contribute to the common good? This course pursues these questions within the Christian social tradition broadly understood through an exploration of the theological relationship between work as a vocation and leisure as contemplation. Within this theological context, the course examines the financial, organizational, technological, and cultural forces that managers and organizations encounter daily. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level THEO course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 01 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

40814 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differeneces are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic trandition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This couse fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diveristy. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 392 - 01 Dante's Divine Comedy - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

43341 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

William J. Junker

This interdisciplinary Catholic Studies/literature course explores Dante Alighierl's Divine Comedy in its literary, historical, theological, religious, political, and linguistic contexts. The course studies in critical detail the complete text of the Commedia in English as well as portions of related works such as Dante's La Vita Nuova. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the Divine Comedy's Catholic Christian themes. Prerequsites: ENGL 111/112 or 190

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 401 - 01 Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

42137 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Robert G. Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101 and Junior standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location