The University of St. Thomas

College of Arts & Sciences | Department of Catholic Studies | Undergraduate Program

Course Offerings

Course Offerings

Current Undergraduate Courses

Catholic Studies: Spring 2014
CATH 101-01
20568
The Search for Happiness
Junker, William J
0955-1135 T R 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 101-02
20569
The Search for Happiness
Kidd, Erika H
0815-0920 M W F 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 101-04
21380
The Search for Happiness
Kidd, Erika H
0935-1040 M W F 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 201-01
20680
Path/Expres/Pract in Cath Spir
Thompson, Christopher J
0800-0940 T R 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course provides an investigation into the various forms and expressions of spirituality which derive their inspiration from a common origin in Christian Revelation and the teachings of the Catholic Church. We will examine in depth a selection of topics and themes having to do with differing expressions and practices of Catholic spirituality across a number of historical eras and cultures. Possible topics include prayer and contemplation; the varieties of lay and religious spiritualities in both their solitary and communal dimensions; virtue; and vocation and work. Interdisciplinary course materials will draw on sources in theology, philosophy, history, literature, and art or music.

CATH 297-03
22710
Dawson&Dynamics of Church Hist
Kennedy, Robert G
1055-1200 M W F 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

CATH 297-04
22726
Many Worlds of GK Chesterton
Deavel, David P
1330-1510 T R 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

CATH 301-01
20016
The Catholic Vision
Kidd, Erika H
0955-1135 T R 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

CATH 301-02
22822
The Catholic Vision
Stevenson, William B
1525-1700 T R 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

CATH 306-01
20017
Christ Faith & Mgmt Profession
Naughton, Michael J
0800-0940 T R MCH 108

4 Credit Hours

What is a good manager and how does he or she contribute to the common good? This course pursues these questions within the Christian social tradition broadly understood through an exploration of the theological relationship between work as a vocation and leisure as contemplation. Within this theological context, the course examines the financial, organizational, technological, and cultural forces that managers and organizations encounter daily. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level THEO course

CATH 308-01
20804
Woman and Man
Kelly, Elizabeth M
1335-1440 M W F 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differeneces are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic trandition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This couse fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diveristy. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

CATH 392-01
22722
Dante's Comedy
Junker, William J
1525-1700 T R 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary Catholic Studies/literature course explores Dante Alighierl's Divine Comedy in its literary, historical, theological, religious, political, and linguistic contexts. The course studies in critical detail the complete text of the Commedia in English as well as portions of related works such as Dante's La Vita Nuova. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the Divine Comedy's Catholic Christian themes. Prerequsites: ENGL 111/112 or 190

CATH 392-02
22911
Dante's Comedy
Junker, William J
1330-1510 T R 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This interdisciplinary Catholic Studies/literature course explores Dante Alighierl's Divine Comedy in its literary, historical, theological, religious, political, and linguistic contexts. The course studies in critical detail the complete text of the Commedia in English as well as portions of related works such as Dante's La Vita Nuova. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the Divine Comedy's Catholic Christian themes. Prerequsites: ENGL 111/112 or 190

Upcoming Undergraduate Courses

Catholic Studies: Fall 2014
CATH 101-01
40595
The Search for Happiness
Thompson, Christopher J
0815-0920 M W F 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 101-02
41970
The Search for Happiness
Boyle, John F
0935-1040 M W F 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 101-03
42194
The Search for Happiness
Foote, David N
0955-1135 T R 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 101-04
43156
The Search for Happiness
STAFF, -
1525-1700 T R TBD

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 101-05
43195
The Search for Happiness
STAFF, -
1730-2115 T 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

CATH 201-01
41122
Path/Expres/Pract in Cath Spir
Deavel, David P
1055-1200 M W F 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course provides an investigation into the various forms and expressions of spirituality which derive their inspiration from a common origin in Christian Revelation and the teachings of the Catholic Church. We will examine in depth a selection of topics and themes having to do with differing expressions and practices of Catholic spirituality across a number of historical eras and cultures. Possible topics include prayer and contemplation; the varieties of lay and religious spiritualities in both their solitary and communal dimensions; virtue; and vocation and work. Interdisciplinary course materials will draw on sources in theology, philosophy, history, literature, and art or music.

CATH 201-03
43157
Path/Expres/Pract in Cath Spir
Deavel, David P
0800-0940 T R 55S

4 Credit Hours

This course provides an investigation into the various forms and expressions of spirituality which derive their inspiration from a common origin in Christian Revelation and the teachings of the Catholic Church. We will examine in depth a selection of topics and themes having to do with differing expressions and practices of Catholic spirituality across a number of historical eras and cultures. Possible topics include prayer and contemplation; the varieties of lay and religious spiritualities in both their solitary and communal dimensions; virtue; and vocation and work. Interdisciplinary course materials will draw on sources in theology, philosophy, history, literature, and art or music.

CATH 222-01
43194
Cath Lit Trad/Medieval-Mdrn
Junker, William J
0935-1040 M W F TBD

4 Credit Hours

This course surveys literary works with theological or spiritual themes that have contributed to the vitality of Catholic culture. The purpose of the course is to help students realize that Catholic culture has fostered a variety of literary expressions and has produced works that speak compellingly of human experience and sacramental life. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

CATH 234-01
41965
Love, Sex, & Friendship
Heaney, Stephen J
1055-1200 M W F 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

A philosophical examination of the nature of human love. Possible topics include reciprocity and permanence, fidelity, romantic love, human sexuality, kinds of friendship. Special attention will be given to the thought of John Paul II. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

CATH 250-01
42933
Christian Mysteries
Coulter, Gregory J
1525-1700 T R MHC 203

4 Credit Hours

A consideration of philosophical problems associated with Catholicism. Possible topics include divine providence, creation, the soul, freedom of the will, faith, the Eucharist, the Incarnation, and the variety of religious beliefs. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

CATH 298-02
43155
The Bible in History
Kennedy, Robert G
1330-1510 T R 55S

4 Credit Hours

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

CATH 301-01
41383
The Catholic Vision
Kidd, Erika H
1330-1510 T R 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

CATH 301-02
41120
The Catholic Vision
STAFF, -
0815-0920 M W F 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

CATH 301-03
43158
The Catholic Vision
STAFF, -
1455-1635 M W 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

CATH 306-01
41966
Christ Faith & Mgmt Profesn
Naughton, Michael J
0800-0940 T R 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

What is a good manager and how does he or she contribute to the common good? This course pursues these questions within the Christian social tradition broadly understood through an exploration of the theological relationship between work as a vocation and leisure as contemplation. Within this theological context, the course examines the financial, organizational, technological, and cultural forces that managers and organizations encounter daily. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level THEO course

CATH 306-02
42982
Christ Faith & Mgmt Profesn
Rolnick, Philip A
1730-2115 W 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

What is a good manager and how does he or she contribute to the common good? This course pursues these questions within the Christian social tradition broadly understood through an exploration of the theological relationship between work as a vocation and leisure as contemplation. Within this theological context, the course examines the financial, organizational, technological, and cultural forces that managers and organizations encounter daily. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level THEO course

CATH 308-01
40971
Woman and Man
Kelly, Elizabeth M
0955-1135 T R 55S 207

4 Credit Hours

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differeneces are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic trandition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This couse fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diveristy. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

CATH 387-01
41973
John Henry Newman
Briel, Don J
1335-1440 M W F 55S

4 Credit Hours

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons. Prerequisite: THEO 101

CATH 401-01
40799
Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath
Kennedy, Robert G
1335-1440 M W F 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. Prerequisite: CATH 101 and Junior standing

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