The University of St. Thomas

College of Arts & Sciences | Department of Catholic Studies | Faculty

Dr. David Foote

Associate Professor of Catholic Studies

dnfoote@stthomas.edu
Phone: (651) 962-5744

Office Location: 300 Sitzmann Hall

Courses taught in Fall 2014
CATH 101-03
42194
The Search for Happiness 0955-1135 T R 55S B10

4 Credit Hours

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

HIST 111-03
42114
Origins: Mod World to 1550 1055-1200 M W F TBD

4 Credit Hours

This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 111-04
42115
Origins: Mod World to 1550 0815-0920 M W F TBD

4 Credit Hours

This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Education

Ph.D. History, University of California, Davis 1998
M.A. History, University of Florida, 1993
B.A. English, University of Florida, 1983

Areas of Expertise

Medieval Italy
Medieval Church
 

Publications

Mendicants and the Italian Communes in Salimbene’s Cronaca,” in The Origin, Development, and Refinement of Medieval Mendicant Identities, ed. Donald Prudlo (Brill Companion Series, forthcoming)

Lordship, Reform, and the Development of Civil Society in Medieval Italy: The Bishopric of Orvieto, 1100-1250. (University of Notre Dame Press, 2004) 

“The Quiet City: Factional Violence and Papal State-building in Fourteenth-Century Orvieto,” in Paula Findlen, Michelle Fontaine, and Duane Osheim eds. Beyond Florence: Rethinking Medieval and Early Modern Italy. (Stanford University Press, 2002)

How the Past Becomes a Rumor: The Notarialization Of Historical Consciousness in Medieval Orvieto,” Speculum 75:4 (October, 2000), 794-815.

Taming Monastic Advocates and Redeeming Bishops: The Triumphale and   Episcopal Vitae of Reiner of St. Lawrence,” Revue d’Histoire Ecclésiastique, 91:1(1996), 5-40.

Presentations

“Ecclesiastical Institutions and the Conversion of the Barbarians: Unity of Process, Diversity of Results,” Presented at the 45th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan May 13-16, 2010.

“An Alien in Their Midst: Reflections on Religion & Society in the Middle Ages,” Presented at the 41st International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan May 4-7, 2006.

“A New Look at the Liber Censuum & Its Tax List,” presented at the 15th Biennial New College Conference on Medieval & Renaissance Studies” At New College, Sarasota Florida, March 9-11, 2006.

“From Charisma to Bureaucracy: The Making of an Episcopal Register in Medieval Orvieto,” Thirteenth Biennial New College Medieval Renaissance Conference, New College, Sarasota, Florida, March 14-16, 2002

“The Quiet City: Factional Violence and Papal State-building in Fourteenth-Century Orvieto,” Beyond Florence: Rethinking Medieval and Early Modern Italy.  Stanford University, November 13-14, 1998

“The Bishopric as a Field of Power and the Formation of Political and Religious Culture in the Early Communes,” Eleventh Biennial New College Medieval Renaissance Conference, New College, Sarasota, Florida, March 12-14, 1998

“When the Past Becomes a Rumor: The “Chronicle” of Bishop Ranerio of Orvieto (1228-1248),” AHA January 8-11, 1998 (Session 42. “Between Continuity and Change: Ways of Remembering in Medieval and Early Modern Society”)

“Writing and the Confluence of Ecclesiastical and Civic Cultures: The Administrative Innovations of Bishop Giovanni of Orvieto (1211-1212),” UC Medieval Seminars, Huntington Library, October 17, 1997

"An Occupation for the Saint: The Passio of Petro Parenzo," Pope Innocent II and His World, An Interdisciplinary Conference, Hofstra University, May 1-3, 1997