Dr. Erika Kidd portrait

Dr. Erika Kidd

Assistant Professor of Catholic Studies
Phone
(651) 962-5788

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 301 - 01 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207
CRN: 41383 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Erika H. Kidd At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 308 - 01 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10
CRN: 20746 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Erika H. Kidd This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differeneces are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic trandition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This couse fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diveristy. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 308 - 02 Woman and Man - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207
CRN: 22531 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Erika H. Kidd This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differeneces are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic trandition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture. This couse fulfills the core curriculum requirement in Human Diveristy. Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)