Dr. Catherine A. Deavel  portrait

Dr. Catherine A. Deavel

Associate Professor of Philosophy
Office
JRC 212
Phone
(651) 962-5372

Academic History

Ph.D., Philosophy, Fordham University, 2000
M.A., Philosophy, Fordham University, 1997
B.A., Philosophy and English, Seattle University 1995                       

Expertise

Ancient Greek Philosophy
History of Philosophy

Selected Publications

"Edith Stein and Fides et Ratio," in Reason and the Rule of Faith: Conversations in the Tradition with John Paul II, eds. Steven A. Long and Christopher J. Thompson (Lanham, Maryland: University of America Press, 2011): 177-196.

"Choosing Love: The Redemption of Severus Snape," co-authored with David Paul Deavel, in The Ultimate Harry Potter and Philosophy: Hogwarts for Muggles, ed. Gregory Basham (Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2010): 39-49.

"Thomas Aquinas and Knowledge of Material Objects: Proper Objects of Cognition." Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association: Reason in Context, 83 (2010), pp. 273-282.

Clark's In the Deep Midwinter and Hansen's Atticus: Examples of a Two-fold Literature of Life," co-authored with David Paul Deavel, New Blackfriars 89 (November 2008): 657-73.

"Relational Evil, Relational Good: Thomas Aquinas and Process Thought," International Philosophical Quarterly, 2007 (peer-reviewed).

“Knowing When to Be Afraid: Rationality and Suspense,” co-authored with David Paul Deavel, invited chapter for Alfred Hitchcock and Philosophy, eds. Shawn Klein and David Baggett, Open Court Press (forthcoming, 2006).

“A Skewed Image: Harry Potter and the Nature of Evil,” co-authored with David Paul Deavel, invited chapter for If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts: Harry Potter and Philosophy, eds. Shawn Klein and David Baggett, Open Court Press, 2004.

Unity and Primary Substance for Aristotle,” Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association, vol. 77, 2003, pp. 159-172 (peer-reviewed, approx. 30% acceptance rate).

Character, Choice, and Harry Potter,” co-authored with David P. Deavel, Logos: Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture, 5:4, Fall 2002. (peer-reviewed, approx. 40% acceptance rate).

Why the Church Needs Art,” Response to an excerpt from John Paul II’s Letter to Artists, in “From a Logical Point of View,” Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture, 5:3, Summer 2002.

"The Deceit of the Other: The Role of the Lie in Levinas' Totality and Infinity," Conference: A Journal of Philosophy and Theory 7.1 (1996) 85-92.

Selected Presentations

“Suffering and Evil,” Suffering and Hope conference, Center for Thomistic Studies, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, November 10-13, 2005.

“Woman and the Recovery of Culture: Reflections on Familiaris Consortio,” The Work of John Paul II and the Vocation of the Professional Woman: Summer Symposium, University of St. Thomas, June 14-18, 2004.

“The Virtuous Soul: Defending Against Simmias’ Harmony Argument,” International Conference on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, Fordham University, New York, October 31-November 2, 2003.

“What is Catholic about Catholic Social Thought?” Catholic Social Thought Across the Curriculum Conference, University of St. Thomas, October 2003.

“Education toward Vocation,” Formation and Renewal conference, Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture, October 2003.

“Immaterial Knowledge of the Material,” XXVIII International Patristic, Medieval, and Renaissance Conference, September 2003.  

“A Two-fold Strategy for a Literature of Life,” with David P. Deavel, From Death to Life: Agendas for Reform conference, Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture, September 2002.

“The Divine Tragedy: Dante and Aristotle on Drama” for the 36th International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2001.  

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - 12 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 233
CRN: 20289 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine A. Deavel An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 14 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 233
CRN: 20291 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine A. Deavel An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 200 - 01 Ancient Philosophy M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 BEC LL07
CRN: 20296 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine A. Deavel A survey of the roots of philosophical inquiry in the classical period. The pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle Prerequisite: PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2015 Courses

Summer 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2015 Courses

Fall 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - 27 Philosophy of Human Person - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC 113
CRN: 41483 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine A. Deavel An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 35 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 210
CRN: 40278 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine A. Deavel An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 36 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 203
CRN: 40713 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine A. Deavel An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)