Major in Biology (B.A.)

  • BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution (4 credits)
  • BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability (4 credits)

Note: The normal expectation is that students will complete BIOL 207, 208, and 209 by the end of their sophomore year.

Plus twenty-four credits, at least four credits of which must be in courses numbered 400-498 (excluding 476, 478) from:

  • BIOL 210 Introduction to Laboratory Research (2 credits)
  • BIOL 211 Introduction to Field Research (4 credits)
  • BIOL 243 Individual Study (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 269 Research (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 287 Biology of HIV and AIDS (2 credits)
  • BIOL 292 Topics without laboratory (4 credits)
  • BIOL 296 Topics (2 credits)
  • BIOL 298 Topics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 302 Animal Diversity (4 credits)
  • BIOL 315 Biology of Plants (4 credits)
  • BIOL 330 Animal Behavior (4 credits)
  • BIOL 333 Ecology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 335 Conservation Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 349 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology: Locomotion and Systems Regulation (4 credits)
  • BIOL 350 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology: Energy Acquisition and Processing (4 credits)
  • BIOL 353 Microscopic Anatomy (4 credits)
  • BIOL 354 Neurobiology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 356 Microbiology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 360 Genetics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 363 Immunology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 365 Developmental Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 371 Cell Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 389 Research (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 393 Individual Study (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 396 Topics (2 credits)
  • BIOL 398 Topics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 415 Plant Physiology and Adaptations to Stress (4 credits)
  • BIOL 430 Evolutionary Ecology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 435 Aquatic Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 462 Molecular Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 464 Bioinformatics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 467 Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases (4 credits)
  • BIOL 471 Evolution (4 credits)
  • BIOL 476 Experiential Learning (2 credits)
  • BIOL 478 Experiential Learning (4 credits)
  • BIOL 484 Seminar (2 credits)
  • BIOL 486 Seminar (4 credits)
  • BIOL 488 Topics (2 credits)
  • BIOL 490 Topics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 491 Research (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 495 Individual Study (2 or 4 credits)*
  • CHEM 440 Biochemistry I (4 credits)**

*A maximum of eight credits in Research and/or Individual Study can be credited toward the requirements of the major.

**CHEM 440 may be counted toward the major as a 300-level elective course.

Allied requirements

  • CHEM 111 General Chemistry I (4 credits)
  • CHEM 112 General Chemistry II (4 credits)
  • CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)

Plus four credits from the following:

  • STAT 220 Statistics I (4 credits)
  • STAT 310 Biostatistics (4 credits)
  • MATH 303 Statistics for the Applied Sciences (4 credits)

NoteThe normal expectation is that students will complete the above allied requirements by the end of the sophomore year.

Plus at least two of the following selected in consultation with the departmental adviser:

  • CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
  • MATH 109 Calculus with Review II (4 credits) or MATH 113 Calculus I (4 credits)
  • PHYS 109 General Physics I (4 credits) or PHYS 111 Introduction to Classical Physics I (4 credits)

Note: Alternative course combinations to satisfy elective allied requirements may be proposed for approval by the department chair. 

Major in Biology (B.S.)

  • BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution (4 credits)
  • BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability (4 credits)

Note:The normal expectation is that students will complete BIOL 207, 208, and 209 by the end of their sophomore year. 

Plus twenty eight credits, at least four credits of which must be in courses numbered 400-498 (excluding 476, 478) from:

  • BIOL 210 Introduction to Laboratory Research (2 credits)
  • BIOL 211 Introduction to Field Research (4 credits)
  • BIOL 243 Individual Study (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 269 Research (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 287 Biology of HIV and AIDS (2 credits)
  • BIOL 292 Topics without laboratory (4 credits)
  • BIOL 296 Topics (2 credits)
  • BIOL 298 Topics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 302 Animal Diversity (4 credits)
  • BIOL 315 Biology of Plants (4 credits)
  • BIOL 330 Animal Behavior (4 credits)
  • BIOL 333 Ecology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 335 Conservation Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 349 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology: Locomotion and Systems Regulation (4 credits)
  • BIOL 350 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology: Energy Acquisition and Processing (4 credits)
  • BIOL 353 Microscopic Anatomy (4 credits)
  • BIOL 354 Neurobiology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 356 Microbiology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 360 Genetics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 363 Immunology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 365 Developmental Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 371 Cell Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 389 Research (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 393 Individual Study (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 396 Topics (2 credits)
  • BIOL 398 Topics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 415 Plant Physiology and Adaptations to Stress (4 credits)
  • BIOL 430 Evolutionary Ecology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 435 Aquatic Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 462 Molecular Biology (4 credits)
  • BIOL 464 Bioinformatics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 467 Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases (4 credits)
  • BIOL 471 Evolution (4 credits)
  • BIOL 476 Experiential Learning (2 credits)
  • BIOL 478 Experiential Learning (4 credits)
  • BIOL 484 Seminar (2 credits)
  • BIOL 486 Seminar (4 credits)
  • BIOL 488 Topics (2 credits)
  • BIOL 490 Topics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 491 Research (2 or 4 credits)*
  • BIOL 495 Individual Study (2 or 4 credits)*
  • CHEM 440 Biochemistry I (4 credits)**

*A maximum of eight credits in Research and/or Individual Study will be credited towards the requirements of the major.

**CHEM 440 may be counted towards the major as a 300-level elective course.

Allied requirements

  • CHEM 111 General Chemistry I (4 credits) and CHEM 112 General Chemistry II (4 credits) orCHEM 115 Accelerated General Chemistry (4 credits)
  • CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
  • MATH 109 Calculus with Review II (4 credits) or MATH 113 Calculus I (4 credits)
  • STAT 220 Statistics I (4 credits) or STAT 310 Biostatistics (4 credits) or MATH 303 Statistics for the Applied Sciences (4 credits)

Note: The normal expectation is that students will complete the above allied requirements by the end of the sophomore year.

  • PHYS 109 General Physics I (4 credits) or PHYS 111 Introduction to Classical Physics I (4 credits)

Other requirements

Eight credits from the followingselected in consultation with the departmental adviser. Alternative course combinations to satisfy this requirement may be proposed for approval by the department chair:

  • Any Biology courses numbered above 209
  • CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
  • CHEM 300 Quantitative Analysis (4 credits)
  • CISC 230 Object-Oriented Design and Programming (4 credits)
  • CISC 342 Computer Applications in Experimental Sciences (4 credits)
  • ENGR 350 Introduction to Electronics (4 credits)
  • ESCI 310 Environmental Problem Solving (4 credits)
  • GEOL 115 Environmental Geology (4 credits)
  • GEOL 162 The Earth’s Record of Climate (4 credits)
  • GEOL 130 Earth History (4 credits)
  • GEOG 223 Remote Sensing (4 credits)
  • HLTH 400 Epidemiology (4 credits)
  • IDSC 312 Gender and Science (4 credits)
  • STAT 310 Biostatistics (4 credits) (if not used to meet the allied requirements)
  • STAT 320 Statistics II (4 credits)
  • MATH 114 Calculus II (4 credits)
  • MATH 315 Applied Mathematics and Modeling I (4 credits)
  • MATH 316 Applied Mathematics and Modeling II (4 credits)
  • PHYS 110 General Physics II (4 credits) or PHYS 112 Introduction to Classical Physics II (4 credits)
  • PSYC 206 The Brain and Human Behavior (4 credits)
  • PSYC 207 Alcohol, Other Drugs and Behavior (4 credits)
  • PSYC 401 Physiological Psychology (4 credits)

Major in Biology of Global Health (B.S.)

Major in Biology of Global Health (B.S.)

Note: A student cannot simultaneously major in the Biology of Global Health and either major or minor in Biology (BA or BS), Biochemistry, or Neuroscience. 

 

BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution (4 credits)

BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics (4 credits)

BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability (4 credits)

BIOL 328 Environmental Toxicology and Health (4 credits)

BIOL 474 Senior Seminar in Global Health (4 credits)

 

Plus 16 credits with at least four credits from each cluster:

Cellular/Molecular cluster

BIOL 356 Microbiology (4 credits)

BIOL 360 Genetics (4 credits)

BIOL 365 Developmental Biology (4 credits)

BIOL 371 Cell Biology (4 credits)

BIOL 462 Molecular Biology (4 credits)

BIOL 464 Bioinformatics (4 credits)

 

Host and Disease Cluster

BIOL 302 Animal Diversity (4 credits)

BIOL 353 Microscopic Anatomy (4 credits)

BIOL 363 Immunology (4 credits)

BIOL 287 Biology of HIV/AIDS (2 credits)

BIOL 467 Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases (4 credits)

BIOL 471 Evolution (4 credits)

 

Ecosystem Health Cluster

BIOL 211 Introduction to Field Research (4 credits)

BIOL 315 Plants, Food and Medicine (4 credits)

BIOL 333 Ecology (4 credits)

BIOL 335 Conservation Biology (4 credits)

BIOL 361 Medical Geology (4 credits)

BIOL 435 Aquatic Ecology (4 credits)

BIOL 490 Urban Ecosystems (4 credits)

 

Allied requirements

CHEM 111 General Chemistry I (4 credits) and CHEM 112 General Chemistry II (4 credits) or Chem 115 Accelerated General Chemistry (4 credits)

HLTH 353              Consumer, Community and Environmental Health (4 credits)

HLTH 400              Epidemiology (4 credits)

STAT 220              Statistics (4 credits)

STAT 310              Biostatistics (4 credits)

 

Plus 12 credits selected in consultation with their academic advisor and approved by the Biology Department Chair. 

1)            The courses must be cohesive and clearly related to each other as a block; however, they may be interdisciplinary and must be outside of Biology.

2)            The block of courses must be clearly related to the Biology of Global Health major.

3)            Students must submit a written proposal for these 12 credits that clearly describes how they are related to each other, and how they are related to the BGH major. The proposal must be approved by the department chair. The student may register for no more than one third of the credits prior to receiving approval of the proposal.

Major in Biochemistry (B.S.)

About Biochemistry

The interface between chemistry and biology has been a rapidly growing area since the 1960s as research efforts in new fields of genetic engineering, structural biology, molecular modeling, and biotechnology have intensified. This trend is reflected both in an increased demand for graduate students in the fields of biochemistry and molecular biology, as well as biotechnology and related fields. To satisfy these demands, biochemistry majors and/or departments have been created at numerous colleges and universities, and have proven quite successful at attracting students and placing their graduates. 

Biochemistry is a rigorous interdisciplinary laboratory science.   
The study of living systems at the molecular level integrates biological and chemical concepts as well as specific knowledge and skills from allied fields such as physics, mathematics and computer science.  Biochemists are scientists trained to communicate across disciplines and to apply these skills in a wide variety of settings.  

Biochemistry provides skill sets required by industry. 
The skills and knowledge acquired by biochemistry students are highly sought after by the biomedical, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries.  The Twin Cities area is a major center for these industries, many of which offer undergraduate summer internship opportunities.  

Biochemistry provides skill sets required by graduate schools.  
A biochemistry degree is excellent preparation for entry into graduate programs in biochemistry, pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, microbiology, molecular genetics, neurology, bio-informatics, ecology and other specialized fields.

Biochemistry provides skill sets required by health professional schools.  
The biochemistry degree program provides excellent preparation for students interested in pursuing a career in the health profession.

For more information about the course requirements for biochemistry majors, please visit the Biochemistry website

Major in Environmental Science (B.S.)

Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary science program focused on solving environmental problems that lie at the interface between biology, chemistry, and geology. Students participate in one of three concentrations (biology, chemistry, or geology) leading to the Bachelor of Science degree, each of which contains substantial coursework from each of these disciplines. This program provides excellent preparation for students wishing to pursue graduate degrees in conservation biology, environmental science, earth system science, or other environmentally-focused programs of study in the sciences. It also provides solid preparation for students planning other types of environmental careers, such as environmental consulting, law, policy, or research.

For more information about the environmental science program, please visit their website

Major in Neuroscience (B.S.)

The Neuroscience Program is an interdisciplinary, research-intensive major that combines coursework in several disciplines with neuroscience-specific experiences in both classrooms and labs. Neuroscience is one of the ten most-popular majors in the College of Arts and Sciences, and eight full-time faculty from the Biology and Psychology departments are affiliated with the program.

Our curriculum is organized in two tiers. During the first two years, students complete foundational coursework in Biology, Chemistry and Psychology. In the Junior and Senior years, students choose from several upper division courses that span several fields within neuroscience, biology and psychology.

Engaging undergraduates in research is a core emphasis for our faculty, and all of our faculty collaborate with undergraduate students in their research. We also have an active student group (the Neuroscience Club) and a chapter of the national neuroscience honor society (Nu Rho Psi) on campus.

Undergraduate neuroscience at St. Thomas is unique among institutions. Because we are larger than a small college, we have more resources to teach our students in state-of-the-art laboratory techniques, more active faculty to give our students exposure to the latest findings and current issues in the field, and more students to provide a diverse, dynamic academic environment. At the same time, we are small enough that our faculty develop personal relationships with our students, and provide opportunities to collaborate on cutting-edge research in both laboratory and field settings.

For more information about the neuroscience program, please visit their website. 

Teacher Licensure

  • Elementary Education with a Co-major in Science and Mathematics for Elementary Education
  • Elementary Education with a Specialty in Science (5-8)
  • Co-major in Science (5-8) – Life Science (9-12) and a Co-major in Secondary Education

For more information about the Teacher Licensure program, please visit the undergraduate admissions website

Minor in Biology

  • BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution (4 credits)
  • BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics (4 credits)
  • BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability (4 credits)

Plus:

  • Eight additional credits in biology courses numbered 200 or above, selected in consultation with the department chair.

Note: CHEM 440 Biochemistry I cannot be counted towards the Biology minor.