Jayna Ditty portrait

Jayna Ditty

Associate Professor
Degree
Ph.D., University of Iowa
Office
OWS 363/Lab: OWS 254
Phone
(651) 962-5245
Mail
OWS 390
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Ave.
Saint Paul MN 55105

Spring 2014 Courses

Spring 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 208 - 01 Biological Comm & Energetics M - W - F 1215 - 1320 JRC 126
CRN: 21218 4 Credit Hours The purpose of this course is to introduce the structure and fuction of cells, and how structure and function drives organismal physiology and diversity. By the end of this course, through lecture and laboratory exercises, students should have an understanding of the basic components of cells, how cells and organisms transfer genetic information to future generations, how communication is integral to cellular and organismal function, and how cells and organisms generate and process energy to drive physiological funtions. In addition, students will continue to improve skills for scientific inquiry through activities designed to increase familiarity with the scientific literature and science terminology, improve skills to design and critically analyze experiments, foster ability to work with a scientific team, and provide opportunities to improve scientific writing. Any one topic covered in this course has enough material for a course of its own. However, this course will give basic overview of a series of selected topics that are meant to introduce students to the vast field of cellular and organismal biology and the use of biological science in life. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in CHEM 112 or CHEM 115 and C- or above in BIOL 207
BIOL 464 - 01 Bioinformatics M - W - F 0815 - 0920 OSS 333
CRN: 21475 4 Credit Hours Bioinformatics is an emerging field in the sciences that arises from the interaction of biology, biochemistry and computational science. The goal of bioinformatics is to find ways to sort, compare, and decode nucleotide and protein sequences to indentify underlying similarities and patterns that are biologically relevant. This knowledge of bioinformatics along with the advent of genome sequencing has changed how scientists investigate problems; intead of looking at how one gene or protein is affected by a particular problem, we now look at how the entire genome (genomics) or the entire organism (proteomics) responds. This course will introduce you to the tools that are available for these tupes of analyses and how the information gained from these tools is used to generate hypotheses in all areas of biological science. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequiste: Any two 300-level biology course (one of which can be CHEM 440).
BIOL 464 - 51 Bioinformatics / Lab - - W - - 1335 - 1735 OWS 379
CRN: 21476 0 Credit Hours Bioinformatics is an emerging field in the sciences that arises from the interaction of biology, biochemistry and computational science. The goal of bioinformatics is to find ways to sort, compare, and decode nucleotide and protein sequences to indentify underlying similarities and patterns that are biologically relevant. This knowledge of bioinformatics along with the advent of genome sequencing has changed how scientists investigate problems; intead of looking at how one gene or protein is affected by a particular problem, we now look at how the entire genome (genomics) or the entire organism (proteomics) responds. This course will introduce you to the tools that are available for these tupes of analyses and how the information gained from these tools is used to generate hypotheses in all areas of biological science. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequiste: Any two 300-level biology course (one of which can be CHEM 440).

Summer 2014 Courses

Summer 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 356 - 01 Microbiology M - W - F 0815 - 0920 OWS 250
CRN: 41620 4 Credit Hours An in-depth study of the biology of microorganisms directed at gaining an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the functions of bacteria and viruses. The importance of microorganisms as they relate to human disease, industry and the environment will be explored through lectures, readings from the literature and discussions. Laboratory includes an independent research project done in collaboration with the professor and peers. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209; completion of or concurrent registration in CHEM201
BIOL 356 - 51 Microbiology/Lab - T - - - 0800 - 1200 OWS 263
CRN: 41621 0 Credit Hours An in-depth study of the biology of microorganisms directed at gaining an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the functions of bacteria and viruses. The importance of microorganisms as they relate to human disease, industry and the environment will be explored through lectures, readings from the literature and discussions. Laboratory includes an independent research project done in collaboration with the professor and peers. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209; completion of or concurrent registration in CHEM201
BIOL 356 - 52 Microbiology/Lab - T - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 263
CRN: 41622 0 Credit Hours An in-depth study of the biology of microorganisms directed at gaining an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the functions of bacteria and viruses. The importance of microorganisms as they relate to human disease, industry and the environment will be explored through lectures, readings from the literature and discussions. Laboratory includes an independent research project done in collaboration with the professor and peers. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209; completion of or concurrent registration in CHEM201
BIOL 356 - 53 Microbiology/Lab - - W - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 263
CRN: 41623 0 Credit Hours An in-depth study of the biology of microorganisms directed at gaining an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the functions of bacteria and viruses. The importance of microorganisms as they relate to human disease, industry and the environment will be explored through lectures, readings from the literature and discussions. Laboratory includes an independent research project done in collaboration with the professor and peers. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209; completion of or concurrent registration in CHEM201

Professional Interests

  • Molecular mechanism of the Synechococcus elongatus prokaryotic circadian clock
  • Photic entrainment of the Synechococcus elongatus circadian clock

  • Chemotaxis towards and degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in Pseudomonas putida F1

  • Efficacy of novel antimicrobial compounds