Religion in a Globalized World: Harmful or Helpful for Human Flourishing?

Lecture by Miroslav Volf, Ph.D. with response from Jon Armajani, Ph.D.

Date & Time:

Thursday, March 30, 2017
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Thursday, March 30, 2017, 7:00 PM

Admission:

free and open to the public

Location:

Coffman Theater
Coffman Memorial Union
University of Minnesota - Minneapolis campus

Miroslav Volf, Ph.D.

Miroslav Volf, Ph.D.

Do we need religion in our modern, globalized world, or is it only a source of conflict and violence? Can religious adherents believe in the truth of their own religions while still protecting the rights of others to believe and practice differently? In this lecture, Dr. Miroslav Volf, Henry B. Wright Professor of Systematic Theology and director of the Yale Center for Faith and Culture at the Yale Divinity School, will explain why world religions offer the moral visions needed to address the challenges of globalization. Volf will also show why religious exclusivism does not necessarily conflict with a political pluralism that allows for religious freedom, but may actually support it.

Miroslav Volf, Ph.D. is the founding Director of the Yale Center for Faith and Culture. A member of the Episcopal Church in the U.S.A. and the Evangelical Church in Croatia, Dr. Volf has been involved in international ecumenical dialogues (for instance, with the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity) and interfaith dialogues (on the executive board of C-1 World Dialogue), and is active participant in the Global Agenda Council on Values of the World Economic Forum. A native of Croatia, he regularly teaches and lectures in Central and Eastern Europe, Asia, and across North America. His publications include Flourishing: Why We Need Religion in a Globalized World (2016); Allah: A Christian Response (2011); and Exclusion and Embrace: A Theological Exploration of Identity, Otherness, and Reconciliation (1996), a winner of the 2002 Grawemeyer Award.

This program is the annual Holmer lecture sponsored by the Anselm House at the University of Minnesota and cosponsored by the Jay Phillips Center for Interfaith Learning.

necessarily 

Share This Event