MN Myths

MYTH - THE TWIN CITIES IS A FROZEN TUNDRA ALL YEAR LONG

We enjoy four distinct seasons, and we share more weather commonalities with Chicago and Boston than Winnipeg or Fairbanks. In fact, we’re geographically closer to Missouri than Canada. Winter typically lasts from late November to early March; average summer temperatures reach the low 80s; and spring and fall — the most favorite times of year for many residents — provide comfortable temps for outdoor activities.

MYTH - ALL WE HAVE IS THE MALL OF AMERICA

On the contrary, while the Mall of America is one of our greatest attractions, more than 3 million people don’t call the Twin Cities home because of it. We take part in award-winning theater performances, get cultured at nearly 60 different museums, dine at farm-to-table restaurants and learn at high-class institutions.

MYTH - THE AREA ISN’T EASY TO ACCESS

Minneapolis-St. Paul is located in the middle of the country, with New York City and Los Angeles just a few hours away by plane, and Chicago just seven hours away by car. Traveling in and out is a breeze at MSP International Airport, the sixth busiest airport in the country serving 35 million people each year. Once you’re here, between the extensive bus routes, comprehensive highway system and the Hiawatha Light Rail line, traveling around is a piece of cake.

MYTH - BLOND HAIR, BLUE EYES: WE ALL LOOK THE SAME

Actually, Hispanics make up 5 percent of the Minnesota population (a 75 percent increase since 2000), while African Americans make up more than 5 percent (a 60 percent increase since 2000). Minneapolis has one of the largest Native American populations in the U.S., while the state as a whole has the largest Hmong, Somali and Liberian communities in the country.

According to the State Demographic Center at the Minnesota Department of Administration, by 2015 the nonwhite population in Minnesota is projected to grow 35 percent, compared to 7 percent for the white population.

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