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St. Thomas offers several pre-professional programs to prepare students for a wide range of fields.

Our academic programs prepare you with required coursework for admission to specialty schools such as dentistry, engineering, law, medicine and more.

Pre Chiropractic

Many courses are offered at St. Thomas to prepare students for admission to the following health professional schools: chiropractic, occupational therapy, optometry, osteopathic medicine, physical therapy, physician assistant, podiatric medicine, and public health.
Students are encouraged to research the programs at each professional school and to seek the guidance of a representative from the Office of Academic Counseling.

Pre Dentistry

Dentistry requires diagnostic ability and manual skills. Since most dentists work in private practice, good business sense and communication skills are also helpful. Here you will find information to prepare for dental school including prerequisite courses, relevant tests, and degree options.
Course preparation varies by dental school. It is the responsibility of each student to confirm requirements for the specific schools to which they may be applying.  Minimum pre-requisites for most programs would require the following UST courses:

Biology
    BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution
    BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics
    BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability
    Two 300-level BIOL electives (CHEM 440 & 442 Biochemistry I & II are acceptable electives)

 Chemistry
    CHEM 111 General Chemistry I (Note: CHEM 115 Accelerated General Chemistry can substitute for CHEM 111 & 112)
    CHEM 112 General Chemistry II
    CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I
    CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II
    CHEM 440 Biochemistry I (strongly recommended)      

Physics
    PHYS 109 General Physics I
    PHYS 110 General Physics II

Mathematics
    MATH 113 Calculus I (Note: MATH 108 & 109 can substitute for 113)

Statistics
    STAT 220 Statistics I

Psychology
    PSYC 111 General Psychology

Pre Engineering

St. Thomas offers a choice of pre-engineering programs to provide the student with a broad range of engineering fields. The program prepares for a wide variety of engineering fields including aeronautical, aerospace, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical,  environmental, geological, industrial, materials science, mechanical and systems engineering.

The programs of study are arranged so that a student may transfer to an engineering school with a maximum number of acceptable credits and yet, if a change in major is made while at the university, a maximum number of credits will be applicable to the St. Thomas requirements for graduation. In addition to the liberal arts, courses pre-requisite to an engineering school program are available in areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer programming, and engineering. There are few significant differences in courses taken in the first two years of undergraduate study toward any type of engineering field. All pre-engineering students take mathematics, physics, and chemistry courses, along with a seminar introducing them to the various fields of engineering and to the work of engineers.

A Liberal Arts-Engineering (3-2) program is offered formally in cooperation with the University of Notre Dame,  and the University of Minnesota. The student will normally spend three years at St. Thomas and, upon approval of St. Thomas and acceptance by the engineering school, two additional years at the engineering school in an engineering field. Upon satisfying the requirements for graduation of both institutions, the student will receive a bachelor of arts (B.A.) degree from the University of St. Thomas and a bachelor of science degree in the selected field of engineering from the engineering school.

A two-year (2-2) program is offered in which the student normally spends two years at St. Thomas (although transfer may be initiated at any time) and two years in a selected engineering field at an engineering school. No St. Thomas degree is awarded.

Pre Law

The best preparation for the study of law is a rigorous undergraduate program that combines depth of study in a major field with breadth of study in the liberal arts. The only true criterion for choice of a major is that it challenge the student's intellectual capabilities.

Regardless of major, pre-law students should include as wide a selection of the following courses, listed alphabetically by departmental designation, as their degree program allows.

Each is beneficial for:

Increasing the student’s knowledge of law
BLAW 301 Legal Environment of Business (4 credits)
BLAW 303 International Business Law (4 credits)
BLAW 304 Real Estate Law (4 credits)
BLAW 351 Environmental Law (4 credits)
BLAW 352 Gender Issues and the Law (4 credits)
BLAW 353 Employment and Labor Law (4 credits)
BLAW 401 Legal Research, Advocacy, and Dispute Resolution (4 credits)
BLAW 403 Marketing Law (4 credits)
COJO 336 Media Law (4 credits)
ECON 321 Law and Economics (4 credits)
ECON 332 Industrial Organization (4 credits)
HIST 326 English Law and Government before the American Revolution (4 credits)
HIST 365 U.S. Constitutional History (4 credits)
POLS 205 Introduction to the American Public Policy Process (4 credits)
POLS 311 Political Trials (4 credits)
POLS 312 Judicial Process (4 credits)
POLS 313 Constitutional Law and Politics (4 credits)
POLS 314 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (4 credits)
POLS 326 International Law and Organizations (4 credits)
POLS 414 Seminar in Law and Judicial Politics (4 credits)

Fostering critical thinking about society
ENGL 402 Writing Literary Nonfiction (4 credits)
HIST 361 American Thought and Culture Since the Civil War (4 credits)
PHIL 357 Political Philosophy (4 credits)
PHIL 359 Philosophy of Law (4 credits)
POLS 373 Political Thought from Marx to the Present (4 credits)
POLS 375 American Political Thought (4 credits)

Providing useful skills and improving analytical ability
ACCT 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting (4 credits)
ACCT 215 Managerial Accounting (4 credits)
COJO 100 Public Speaking (4 credits)
COJO 276 Argumenta" on and Advocacy (4 credits)
COJO 366 Persuasion (4 credits)
ECON 251 Principles of Macroeconomics (4 credits)
ECON 252 Principles of Microeconomics (4 credits)
ECON 355 Game Theory (4 credits)
ENGL 251 Writing in the Academy (4 credits)
ENGL 252 Writing Nonfiction Prose (4 credits)
ENGL 304 Analytical and Persuasive Writing (4 credits)
MATH 101 Finite Mathematics (4 credits) or MATH 113 Calculus I (4 credits)
PHIL 220 Logic (4 credits)

Pre Medicine

Here you will find important information on preparing for medical school, including prerequisite coursework, relevant test information, and degree options.

As you are reading over this material, there are a few things to keep in mind:

“Pre-med” is not a major. Pre-medicine is a set of course requirements that prepares you for success on the MCAT and as a medical student.

You do not have to major in the sciences in order to gain admission to medical school. In fact, statistics show that humanities/social science majors are admitted at a slightly higher rate.

As you select your major, you should consider an alternative career that you would find interesting and rewarding and major in a field that will prepare you to enter that career.

Minimum pre-requisites for most pre-medical programs would require the following UST courses:

Biology
BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution
BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics
BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability
Two 300-level BIOL electives (CHEM 440 & 442 Biochemistry I & II are acceptable electives as well)

Chemistry
CHEM 111 General Chemistry I (Note: CHEM 115 Accelerated General Chemistry can substitute for CHEM 111 & 112)
CHEM 112 General Chemistry II
CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 440 Biochemistry I (strongly recommended)

Physics
PHYS 109 General Physics I
PHYS 110 General Physics II

Mathematics
MATH 113 Calculus I (Note: MATH 108 & 109 Calculus with Review I & II can substitute for 113)

Statistics
STAT 220 Statistics I

Psychology
PSYC 111 General Psychology

Sociology
SOCI 100 Introduction to Sociology

The health professions advisor is available to help students choose the specific coursework necessary to meet admissions requirements, explain admissions procedures, provide information to students about career alternatives, etc. Students interested in a career in medicine should seek guidance from an advisor in Academic Counseling and Support early in their freshman year to plan an appropriate four-year program.

Pre Occupational Therapy

Many courses are offered at St. Thomas to prepare students for admission to an occupational therapy program. Students are encouraged to research programs at each professional school and to seek the guidance from an advisor in Academic Counseling and Support.

Medically oriented professional schools recognize the desirability of a broad liberal education that includes a strong foundation in the natural sciences, well developed communication skills and a background in the social sciences and humanities. The common curriculum of St. Thomas’ liberal arts and sciences program incorporates courses that provide all of these perspectives.
Students interested in health-related careers will need to declare a major as well as take specific courses required for admission to the professional graduate programs of their choice.

The Office of Academic Counseling and Support provides resources to students to assist in choosing specific coursework necessary to meet professional school admission requirements and understanding procedures.

Pre Optometry

Medically oriented professional schools recognize the desirability of a broad liberal education that includes a strong foundation in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics), well developed communication skills, and a background in the social sciences and humanities. The common curriculum of St. Thomas’ liberal arts and sciences program incorporates courses that provide all of these perspectives.

Students interested in health-related careers will need to declare a major as well as take specific courses required for admission to the professional graduate programs of their choice. The Office of Academic Counseling provides resources and support to students in choosing specific coursework necessary to meet professional school admission requirements and understanding procedures.

Pre Pharmacy

Pharmacists are an increasingly important piece of the health care puzzle, as more pharmacists are counseling patients in planning therapy regiments. According to the Department of Labor, the job outlook for pharmacists is excellent. Here, you will find information about attending pharmacy school, including prerequisite coursework, relevant tests, and degree options.

Course preparation varies by pharmacy school. It is the responsibility of each student to confirm requirements for the specific schools to which they may be applying.  Minimum pre-requisites for most programs would require the following UST courses:

Biology
BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution
BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energies
BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability
BIOL 356 Microbiology

Chemistry
CHEM 111 General Chemistry I (Note: CHEM 115 Accelerated General Chemistry can substitute for CHEM 111 & 112)
CHEM 112 General Chemistry II
CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 440  Biochemistry I 

Anatomy & Physiology
BIOL 349 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology: Locomotion and Systems Regulation
BIOL 350 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology: Energy Acquisition and Processing

OR

PHED 213 Human Anatomy
PHED 214 Physiology

Physics
PHYS 109 General Physics I
PHYS 110 General Physics II

Mathematics
MATH 113 Calculus I (Note: MATH 108 & 109 Calculus with Review I & II can substitute for 113)

Statistics
STAT 220 Statistics I

Psychology
PSYC 111 General Psychology

Communication & Journalism
COJO 100 Public Speaking

Pre Physical Therapy

Physical therapists provide care to people of all ages who have functional problems resulting from, for example, back and neck injuries, sprains/strains and fractures, and injuries related to work and sports. Physical therapists examine each individual and develop a plan using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. Here, you will find information on prerequisite coursework, relevant tests, and degree options.

Course preparation varies by physical therapy school. It is the responsibility of each student to confirm requirements for the specific schools to which they may be applying.  Minimum pre-requisites for most programs would require the following UST courses:

Biology
BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution
BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics
BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability
Upper level biology elective

Chemistry
CHEM 111 General Chemistry I (Note: CHEM 115 Accelerated General Chemistry can substitute for CHEM 111 & 112)
CHEM 112 General Chemistry II

Health & Human Performance
PHED 240 Medical Terminology (2 credits)
PHED 213 Human Anatomy
PHED 214 Human Physiology
PHED 326 Kinesiology  
          
Physics
PHYS 109 General Physics I
PHYS 110 General Physics II

Mathematics
MATH 113 Calculus I (Note: MATH 108 & 109 Calculus with Review I & II can substitute for 113)

Statistics
STAT 220 Statistics I

Psychology
PSYC 111 General Psychology
Upper level PSYC elective

Plus, 100+ hours of DPT observation.

Pre Physician Assistant

Interest and application to physician assistant programs has grown exponentially over the past few years. Physician Assistants practice medicine under the supervision of a physician or surgeon, but have considerable job autonomy including the ability to write prescriptions. Job opportunities are good, especially in rural and inner-city areas that have a shortage of physicians.

Course preparation varies by school. It is the responsibility of each student to confirm requirements for the specific schools to which they may be applying.  Minimum pre-requisites for most PA programs would require the following UST courses:

Biology
•    BIOL 207 Genetics, Ecology, and Evolution
•    BIOL 208 Biological Communication and Energetics
•    BIOL 209 Biology of Sustainability
•    BIOL 349 & 350 (or PHED 208 Human Anatomy & Physiology or PHED 213 Human Anatomy & PHED 214 Physiology)
•    BIOL 356 Microbiology

Chemistry
•    CHEM 111 General Chemistry I(Note: CHEM 115 Accelerated General Chemistry can substitute for CHEM 111 & 112)
•    CHEM 112 General Chemistry II
•    CHEM 201 Organic Chemistry I
•    CHEM 202 Organic Chemistry II
•    CHEM 440 Biochemistry Health & Human Performance
•    PHED 240 Medical Terminology (2 credits)

Physics
•    PHYS 109 General Physics I
•    PHYS 110 General Physics II

Mathematics
•    MATH 113 Calculus I (Note: MATH 108 & 109 Calculus with Review I & II can substitute for 113)

Statistics
•    STAT 220 Statistics I

Psychology
•    PSYC 111 General Psychology

Plus, 500+ hours of direct patient care experience.

Pre Veterinary

If you enjoy science, working with animals, and interacting with people, becoming a veterinarian may be a good fit for you. Because there are fewer veterinary schools than medical schools, admission to vet school is highly competitive. Having prior formal or informal experience working with animals can be advantageous. Here you will find information on prerequisite coursework, required tests, and degree options.

Course preparation varies by veterinary school. It is the responsibility of each student to confirm requirements for the specific schools to which they may be applying. Below is a summary of courses required by many of the colleges and schools. Not all of the courses are required at each school. It may be possible that schools to which you plan to submit an application require courses not offered by UST. If that is the case, consult with the veterinary colleges to determine if another closely-related course can be substituted. This is a common occurrence with animal science courses.  If no substitution can be made, you may need to consider other options, such as taking the course at a different undergraduate college (possibly during the summer), inquire if the course can be taken via a distance-learning or web-based class, or transfer to another undergraduate college.

Math and Sciences

    Algebra/Trigonometry
    Calculus/Precalculus
    Animal Sciences
    Animal Nutrition
    Biology with lab
    Cell biology
    Inorganic Chemistry with lab
    Organic Chemistry with lab
    General Physics
    Biochemistry
    Embryology
    Genetics
    Microbiology
    Statistics
    Zoology
    Immunology

Non-Sciences

    English Composition
    Literature
    Humanities/Arts and Social Sciences
    Public Speaking/Speech
    Behavioral Sciences

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