Wilkinson, Elizabeth portrait

Wilkinson, Elizabeth

Assistant Professor of English
Office
JRC 358
Phone
(651) 962-5632
Mail
JRC 333

Academic History
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
M.A., Virginia Polytechnic and State University
B.A., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University at University Park
At St. Thomas since 2008

Expertise/Specialties
Native American and Indigenous Literatures
American Literature before 1900
Women's Literatures

Selected Publications
Wilkinson, Elizabeth. “Ann Rinaldi’s My Heart Is on the Ground as Literary Colonization of Zitkala-Ša’s American Indian Stories.” Indigenous Nations Studies Journal 3.1 (2002): 47-62.

Selected Presentations
“Feminist, Indian-Feminist, and Anti-US Indian Policy Sentiments in Texts by Zitkala-Sa, Sarah Winnemucca, and Joy Harjo.” Native American and Indigenous Studies Conference (NAIS), Athens, Georgia, 2008.

“‘We Are Your Mothers’:  Cherokee Women’s Voices for Land Preservation.” American Literature Association Conference (ALA), Boston, 2007.

“Declaiming and Demarcating: Gertrude Bonnin’s Sentimental Campaign for Native Land.” Society for the Study of American Women Writers Conference (SSAWW), Philadelphia, 2006.

“Sarah Winnemucca: ‘Postindian Warrior’ Writing for the Land.” Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States Conference (MELUS),     Boca Raton, 2006.

“Created ‘White’-ness and Hopi Prophecy in Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of the Dead.” New Directions in American Indian Research: A Gathering of Emerging Scholars, Chapel Hill, 2004.

“(Re)Narrative Resistance: The Political Writings of Zitkala-Sa.” International American Women Writers of Color Conference (AWWOC), Baltimore, 2004.

Membership in Professional Organizations
Native American and Indigenous Studies 
Society for the Study of American Women Writers
Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States
American Literature Association
Modern Language Association

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - 04 Travel: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212
CRN: 42392 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people that we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 41 HONORS: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 42390 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for Aquinas Honors Scholars Program students only.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 217 - 01 Multicultural Literature M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 222
CRN: 40473 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of authors drawn from the literature of one of the following: (a) American communities of color; (b) postcolonial peoples; (c) diasporic peoples. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts from at least one such literary tradition, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 337 - 01 Native Amer Lit & Environment M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320
CRN: 21836 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Offered with specific subtitles, this course provides an intensive focus on a selected body of literature concerning one of the following aspects of human diversity: race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation. Students will also consider relevant critical approaches and concepts. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

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