Pawlowski, Lucia portrait

Pawlowski, Lucia

Assistant Professor
Office
JRC 317
Phone
(651) 962-5619

Academic History
Ph.D., University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
M.A., University of Missouri-Columbia
B.A. St. Vincent College (Latrobe, PA)
At St. Thomas since 2012

Dissertation 
“High Theory, the Teaching of Writing, and the Crisis of the University”

Specialties / Interests 
Rhetoric and Composition 
Post-Structuralism 
Critical University Studies 

Developing Interests 
Queer Theory 
Marx
Radical Pedagogy

Courses Taught
English 300: Theory and Practice of Writing 
English 121: Critical Thinking (Theme: Work). 

Selected Presentations
“Forging Teacher Community: What Works?” 3rd Annual Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Conference Brooklyn Park, MN (March 2011)
“Queer Theory and Academic Discourse” Modern Language Association Annual Conference Los Angeles, CA (January 2011)
“Pedagogy of the Drop-Out“ Rhetoric Society of America Biennial Conference Minneapolis, MN (May 2010)
“Experimental Research Papers: Problems and Possibilities” Annual First-Year Writing Symposium, Writing Studies Department University of Minnesota-Twin Cities (May 2010)
“The Anti-Personal Statement” 2nd Annual Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Conference St. Paul, MN (April 2010)
“Queering Academic Discourse: Re-inventing the (Neo-liberalized) University--in Drag” Convention of the Conference on College Composition and Communication Louisville, KY (March 2010)
“Queering Academic Discourse in Freshman Composition” “Reworking the University: Actions, Strategies, Demands” Conference University of Minnesota-Twin Cities (April 2009)
“Community in the No-Grades Classroom” 1st Annual Minnesota State Colleges and Universities Conference Minneapolis, MN (April 2009)
“Language and Textuality Games” First-Year Writing Orientation, Writing Studies Department University of Minnesota-Twin Cities (August 2009)
“The Aural as Politicized Resistance to Translation in Sebald’s The Emigrants” Graduate Conference, Department of Cinema and Comparative Literature University of Iowa (February 2007)
“Consuming the Black Spirit: Theorizing the Role of the Black Shaman in Popular Film” American Folklore Society Conference Albuquerque, NM (October 2003)
“Revising Anorexia Through Feminist Ethnography: Letting Other Readings Besides the ‘Pathological’ Speak” American Folklore Society Conference Rochester, NY (October 2002)
“Wendy Rose’s Living Bones: Reversing the Discourse of the Dead Indian” Annual 20th Century American Literature Conference University of Kentucky at Louisville (May 2002)
“Ballet: an Ethnography at the Intersection of Gender, Aesthetics, and the Body” English Graduate Student Association Annual Conference University of Missouri-Columbia (April 2002)
“Incompleteness as Pedagogy and Scholarly Practice” English Department Colloquium “Writing in Graduate School” University of Missouri-Columbia (October 2002)
“Cracking the Egg: Decoding as an Ethical Step Backwards in Interpretive Folkloristics” American Folklore Society Anchorage, AK (October 2001)
“When the Blues Bleeds Over: Sermonic Discourse in Contemporary Women’s Pop Music” American Folklore Society Columbus, OH (October 2000)
“Morrison’s Beloved and the Possibilities of Folkloric Literary Criticism” American Folklore Society Nashville, TN (November 1999)
“Community and Technology in the Graduate Seminar” English Department Colloquium “Re-conceiving the Graduate Seminar” University of Missouri-Columbia (May 1999)

Community Engagement and Activism 
Co-Founder, U of MN chapter of the Experimental College of the Twin Citieshttp://www.excotc.org/ (Fall 2007-2009)

- A free, progressive university where anyone can teach and anyone can learn 
- Offers hundreds of classes every semester throughout the Twin Cities 
- Collaborates with dozens of Twin Cities organizations like Sibley Bike Coop, the Brian Coil
  Center, Youth Against Police Brutality, and Minneapolis Free Space 
- Classes include: Bike Maintenance for Girls; Web Design for Your Community Org 
- One of five grassroots organizers to start our chapter within one academic year with a budget of
  less than $200 
- Went from offering 8 classes in Fall 2007 to offering 40 classes in Spring of 2008 
- My Primary Roles: web design and maintenance; document writer 
- Other tasks: grant-writing, budget management, inreach/outreach; composition of social media,
  newsletter and other public relations materials; course assessment tools. 
- Collaborated with the then one-year old Macalester chapter EXCO in 2008; went on to add 3rd,
  branch, Academia Communitaria 
- Co-taught course “Theorizing the U” in Spring 2009

Communications Committee and Press Contact, Graduate Student Workers United
University of Minnesota (August 2008-August 2010). Within a committee of five other graduate students across several departments, wrote press materials and gave interviews to the press about the actions of this coalition dedicated to workplace issues.

Grants and Awards
Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, University of Minnesota (2010-2011)
University fellowship that required a departmental nomination. Two fellowships were awarded to English graduate students and 115 across the university
Outstanding Graduate Instructor Award in Composition, University of Minnesota (2006)
Nomination is by students Also nominated: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Two graduate instructors honored per academic year
Charles Christensen Library Acquisition Prize, University of Minnesota (2007)
One of two yearly $2500 prizes awarded to English graduate students to build an academic library in a department-wide essay competition with nearly a hundred applicants

Membership in Professional Organizations
Modern Language Association 
Rhetoric Society of America 
National Council of Teachers of English

Summer 2014 Courses

Summer 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 204 - 01 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 208
CRN: 42361 4 Credit Hours We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variation of African-Americans, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine power negotiations involved in these variations. We will likely read Joe Goodwin's MORE MAN THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.
ENGL 204 - 02 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210
CRN: 42388 4 Credit Hours We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in Ameria. We will read about the language variation of African-American, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine the power negotiations involved in these variations. Likely books to be read include Joe Goodwin's MORE THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.
ENGL 380 - 01 Issues in English Studies M - W - F 1055 - 1200 OEC 208
CRN: 40407 4 Credit Hours This course focuses on ideas and practices central to advanced work in the field of language and literature. In addition to refining students' facility with critical concepts and scholarly methodology, this course will explore a number of key questions for current work in the discipline: How do we define such concepts as literacy, literature, and interpretation? How do we understand the relationship between reader, writer, and text? How do such factors as gender, culture, and history affect our understanding of literature and of ourselves as writers and readers? Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204; at least two courses in ENGL at or beyond ENGL 211

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

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