Herrera, Olga portrait

Herrera, Olga

Assistant Professor of English
Office
JRC 313
Phone
(651) 962-5613
Mail
JRC 333

Academic History
M.A., Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin
B.A. DePaul University
At St. Thomas since 2009

Expertise/Specialties
Mexican American Literature
Latino Literatures
Urban and Working-Class Literature
Chicana Feminisms
Race and Place in American Literature
Latinos/as in Film, Art, and Popular Culture

Selected Publications
“Revolutionary Dreams and Folkloric Practice: Radical Labor Politics in the Work of Carlos A. Cortez and Richard Wright.”  Forthcoming, Interior Borderlands: Writings on Latina/o Literature of Chicago and the Midwest, ed. William Barillas, University of Illinois Press.

Interview with Ramon Saldívar.  Ethnic and Third World Review of Books, University of Texas, Spring 2008.

Rev. of Lost City Radio, by Daniel Alarcón.  The Austin American-Statesman, 18 Feb. 2007: J05.

Rev. of the Gloria Anzaldúa Papers.  Ethnic and Third World Review of Books, University of Texas, Spring 2007.

 

Selected Presentations
“So Far from Aztlan, So Close to the Borderlands: Sandra Cisneros, Ana Castillo, and Mexican Chicago Literature.”  Paper presented at the American Comparative Literature Association, New Orleans, LA, April 2010.

Invited speaker, inaugural Américo Paredes Literature & Letters Award ceremony honoring Ana Castillo, Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas, Austin, May 2009.

“Revolutionary Dreams and Folkloric Practice: Radical Labor Politics in the Work of Carlos Cortez and Richard Wright.” Paper presented at the American Studies Association conference, Albuquerque, NM, October 2008.

“In the Master’s House: Chicago Space, Race, and Labor in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle and Richard Wright’s Native Son.” Paper presented at the Conference of Ford Fellows, Washington D.C., September 2008.

“Blogueando:  Chicano/a Bloggers and the Construction of Gender Identity.”  Paper presented at the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association conference, Boston, MA, April 2007.

“Fea is as fea does:  Revisions and Reiterations of Latina Beauty in Ugly Betty.” Paper presented at the SW/TX Popular/American Culture conference, Albuquerque, NM, February 2007.

“Work for Whoever Wants It?  Race, Gender, and the Promise of Work in the City of Big Shoulders in Ana Castillo’s Peel My Love Like An Onion.”  Paper presented at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, November 2006, Philadelphia, PA.

“Latina Literature and Trends in Mainstream Publishing.”  Paper presented at the Latina Letters Conference, San Antonio, TX, July 2005.

“‘For those who cannot out’: Textual Differences in Three Editions of The House on Mango Street.”  Paper presented at the South Central Modern Language Association Conference, Houston, TX, October 2005.

Awards
Dissertation Fellow 2008-2009
Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships

Borderlands Research Award
College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas at Austin, Spring 2007

Alternate selection
Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships, April 2004

Summer 2014 Courses

Summer 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 698 - 01 Independent Reading - - - - - 1730 - 2115
CRN: 30650 3 Credit Hours

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - 01 Travel: Journey Narratives M - W - F 0935 - 1040 JRC 227
CRN: 42358 4 Credit Hours Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND-- as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.
ENGL 201 - 42 HONORS: Journey Narratives M - W - F 1055 - 1200 JRC 227
CRN: 42391 4 Credit Hours Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for Aquinas Honors Scholars Program students only.
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - W - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 307
CRN: 40681 4 Credit Hours The study of significant American authors from the turn of the century to the present. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has been formed. Possible authors studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Morrison, Cather, Wharton, Rich, and O'Neill. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

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