Bernard J. Armada portrait

Bernard J. Armada

Professor of Communication and Journalism
Degree
B.A., Queens College
M.A., Kent State University
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Office
OEC 119G
Phone
(651) 962-5825
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5825
Mail
Mail 5011
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105

Scholarship and service:
Professor Armada's research areas are in the rhetoric of race and the rhetorical construction of culture and public memory.  He has won local and national awards (for his teaching and research, respectively), including UST’s Distinguished Educator Award and the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation award from the National Communication Association.  He has published in such journals as the Southern Communication Journal, the Review of Communication, and theReview of Cultural Studies.  His latest article (co-authored with Sonja K. Foss and William J.C. Waters) is "Toward a Theory of Agentic Orientation: Rhetoric and Agency in 'Run Lola Run'" published in the August 2007 issue of the journal Communication Theory.  The article uses "the film Run Lola Run to explicate three agentic orientations—victim, supplicant, and director—each with a different interpretation of structure, a different response to that interpretation, and a different outcome."

At UST:
Professor Armada joined UST in 1997.

Spring 2016 Courses

Spring 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Summer 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
COJO 111 - 06 Intro to COJO-I - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 303
CRN: 41733 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bernard J. Armada This is the first of a two-course sequence that introduces students to essential skills of the communication and journalism discipline. Students will develop skills to communicate thoughtfully, professionally and ethically with a variety of public audiences. Essential writing and public speaking skills are paired so that students master a writing style and then convert that writing to an oral presentation, or vice versa. Students learn how to appropriately and effectively speak and write to academic, professional and citizen audiences. Students are strongly encouraged to complete this course and COJO 112 before taking any 300- or 400-level COJO courses. -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 212 - 01 Rhetorical Criticism - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 114
CRN: 40658 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bernard J. Armada This course teaches students to become more critical consumers and producers of public messages. Students will examine a mix of historical and contemporary examples of persuasive communication in order to develop an awareness of the rhetorical power of messages in everyday life. Critical tools will be covered to help the student learn how to approach a communicative act systematically, identifying crucial interactions and suggesting ways of understanding how those interactions function. The emphasis on critical consumption also enables students to become more effective creators of public messages. Prerequisite: COJO 111 or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 326 - 01 Modern American Rhetoric - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC 113
CRN: 42598 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bernard J. Armada This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference. This course fulfills the Human Diversity Core requirement Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)