Spring 2014 Approved American Culture & Difference Course Offerings

Note: Other courses, including those offered at ACTC schools, may be approved for the minor. Please check with the interim director, Dr. Todd Lawrence (dtlawrence@stthomas.edu), if you have questions about courses that are not on this list

Students interested in taking courses that fulfill American Culture and Difference requirements can use the listings below to plan their curriculum.

Note:

For the minor in American Culture and Difference:

  • 24 credits of six courses

    • one core or "foundation" course in cultural studies -- ACST 200 Foundations of American Culture and Difference (four credits)
    • five elective courses, no more than two courses from a single department (twenty credits)

Summer 2014 Courses

Summer 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
COJO 430 - 01 Society, Culture and the Media - - - - - -
CRN: 30623 Credit Hours Instructor: Dina Gavrilos Society, Culture and the Media examines the role media play in social and cultural formations. The course looks beyond the media as transmitters of information to their broadest social and cultural effects. Students study media as agents of enlightened social modernism, as political and economic institutions, as purveyors of popular culture, and as aspects of cultural and sub-cultural rituals. History, political economy, critical studies, cultural anthropology, semiotics and sociology are among the areas from which approaches for studying the media are considered in the course. Prerequisite: COJO 211, 212 or 213, or permission of instructor

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - 01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. M - W - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 126
CRN: 41945 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David T. Lawrence In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.
COJO 328 - 01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender - T - R - 1525 - 1700 BEC 113
CRN: 40789 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Dina Gavrilos This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women┬┐s Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: COJO 211, or 212, or 213 or junior standing
COJO 338 - 01 Political Communication M - - - - 1800 - 2130 BEC 113
CRN: 42414 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Debra L. Petersen Political Communication is a survey of how politicians use various communication strategies, particularly during campaigns, in local, state and national elections to influence public and legislative audiences. Examination of oral presentations, electronic media, written materials, and web-based appeals will be central to the course. Students will apply theory to specific political situations and candidates, will conduct interviews, and will write papers and make presentations on their findings. Prerequisite: COJO 212 or junior standing
COJO 430 - 01 Society, Culture and the Media - T - R - 1330 - 1510 BEC 113
CRN: 42415 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Dina Gavrilos Society, Culture and the Media examines the role media play in social and cultural formations. The course looks beyond the media as transmitters of information to their broadest social and cultural effects. Students study media as agents of enlightened social modernism, as political and economic institutions, as purveyors of popular culture, and as aspects of cultural and sub-cultural rituals. History, political economy, critical studies, cultural anthropology, semiotics and sociology are among the areas from which approaches for studying the media are considered in the course. Prerequisite: COJO 211, 212 or 213, or permission of instructor
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - W - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 307
CRN: 40681 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera The study of significant American authors from the turn of the century to the present. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has been formed. Possible authors studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Morrison, Cather, Wharton, Rich, and O'Neill. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204
ENGL 215 - 02 American Authors II M - W - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 210
CRN: 43254 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber The study of significant American authors from the turn of the century to the present. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has been formed. Possible authors studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Morrison, Cather, Wharton, Rich, and O'Neill. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204
HIST 116 - 02 Afr Amer Hist Glob Persp M - W - F 0935 - 1040 MHC 208
CRN: 42422 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne Klejment An introductory social history survey of African-American experience in global perspective. This course will cover developments from the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade through the present. Topics include: West African cultures; origins of the international slave trade; African American life in the colonies and during the Revolution; development of slavery in global comparative perspective; resistance to slavery; and the role of African Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras; Jim Crow culture; African American culture; migration; black nationalism and independent Africa; the freedom movements of the North and South; and African American popular culture. This course fulfills the general education requirement in historical studies.
HIST 116 - P1 Afr Amer Hist Glob Persp M - W - F 0815 - 0920 MHC 208
CRN: 42421 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne Klejment An introductory social history survey of African-American experience in global perspective. This course will cover developments from the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade through the present. Topics include: West African cultures; origins of the international slave trade; African American life in the colonies and during the Revolution; development of slavery in global comparative perspective; resistance to slavery; and the role of African Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras; Jim Crow culture; African American culture; migration; black nationalism and independent Africa; the freedom movements of the North and South; and African American popular culture. This course fulfills the general education requirement in historical studies.
MUSC 216 - 01 Jazz in America - T - R - 1525 - 1700 BEC 110
CRN: 40248 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joan E. Griffith The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.
SOCI 251 - 01 Race and Ethnicity M - W - F 1215 - 1320 OEC 452
CRN: 40338 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Buffy Smith Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies and fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: sophomore standing
SPAN 332 - 01 Latin Amer Cult & Civil - T - R - 0955 - 1135 OEC 308
CRN: 41505 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paola B. Ehrmantraut Physical and human geography. History of Latin America from pre-Hispanic civilizations through modern times. Political problems. Rural Latin America. Latin American society, cultural values. Religion. Economic problems. Offered in spring semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

 

Additional Approved Courses - Fall 2014

Note: Other courses, including those offered at ACTC schools, may be approved for the minor. Please check with the interim director (dtlawrence@stthomas.edu) if you have questions about courses that are not on this list.


ENGL   217/01   CRN 40473     Multicultural Literature   
Wilkinson, Elizabeth L    JRC 222      SP        09/03-12/19               M W F             1335-1440

This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of authors drawn from the literature of one of the following: (a) American communities of color; (b) postcolonial peoples; (c) diasporic peoples. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts from at least one such literary tradition, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204 


ENGL   337/01   CRN 42369             Literature and Human Rights
Chowdhury, Kanishka   JRC 222       SP        09/03-12/19               T R                  1525-1700

Offered with specific subtitles, this course provides an intensive focus on a selected body of literature concerning one of the following aspects of human diversity:  race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation. Students will also consider relevant critical approaches and concepts. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204


HIST   372/01   CRN 42423              Vietnam & United States
Klejment, Anne           SCB 206         SP        09/03-12/19               M W                1335-1510

The causes, events, personalities and consequences of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. Background on Vietnamese culture, nationalism, colonial status, wartime occupation, social revolution, and civil war. Role of cold war culture and politics, the media, public opinion, and military strategy in defining the U.S. commitment in Southeast Asia. Analyzes the strategies of opponents of the war and the aftermath of the war in the U.S. and Vietnam. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course 


JPST   280/01    CRN 40608             Active Nonviolence
Nelson-Pallmeyer, Jack A   SCB 328   SP    09/03-12/19                T R                 0955-1135


Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements.  Usually offered every semester.


JPST   365/01   CRN 41967             Leadership for Social Justice
Klein, Michael C         OSS LL18       SP        09/03-12/19               T R                  1525-1700


Leadership for Social Justice examines the arc of leadership through the process of creating, sustaining, then institutionalizing positive social change. The course examines models and case studies of authoritative, positional, influential and situational leadership in diverse settings such as community organizing, social movements, social entrepreneurship and nonprofit management. The course also explores approaches to ethical leadership and provides opportunities for students to develop the skills and vision needed to become ethical leaders for social justice. Students will analyze the role of leadership in the tensions between preserving order and promoting transformation. They will develop a critical approach to the dynamics of power in order to effect systemic change.


MUSC   162/01   CRN 40875             Roots of Blues, Rock, Country
Schroepfer, Mark T     BEC 110         SP        09/03-12/19              M W                1335-1510

This course traces the development of American popular music from its roots through multiple genres such as minstrelsy, jazz, big band, swing, crooning, jump blues, gospel, rhythm and blues, country, western, folk/protest, and rock 'n' roll, concluding with the British Invasion. Popular music development is critically examined through four interrelated driving forces: identity (ethnicity, gender, culture, generation), centers vs. peripheries (the established vs. the innovative), technology (impact on musical performance and listening), and business/law (commercial competition and development). Multimedia presentations include extensive audio and video support. Designed for the Popular Music minor, this course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.


POLS   205/01   CRN 40310             Intro American Public Political Process
High-Pippert, Angela   JRC 246        SP        09/03-12/19              T R                  0800-0940 

A survey of the way public policy is made in the American political system including agenda-setting, formulation of  alternative policy choices, representation of interests and  selection and implementation of policy options. Public policy case studies will be used as illustrations. Students also will be introduced to data analysis as a tool for policy evaluation. Prerequisite: POLS 104 or permission of the instructor 


POLS   404/01   CRN 40659              Seminar in American Politics
High-Pippert, Angela   OEC 314        SP        09/03-12/19             T                      1330-1630
  
Seminars in political science provide an opportunity for students to synthesize and further develop knowledge gained in earlier courses and enhance their critical and  analytical skills. Students in the seminars will engage in reading and discussion and undertake a major research project pertinent to the seminar's topic. Specific topics or themes of each seminar will vary. Seminars are offered in each of the sub-fields of the discipline.


SOCI   110/01   CRN 40334              Social Problems
Smith, Buffy            OEC 452             SP        09/03-12/19              M W F             0815-0920

Contemporary society is confronted with a number of serious problems that are often global in their impact. This course explores the causes, effects, and proposed solutions to some of these major social issues. Special attention is given to issues of inequality (such as racism, sexism, and poverty) and problems in core institutions (such as family violence, unequal educational opportunities, and unemployment). This course meets a requirement in the Justice and Peace Studies program and fulfills the Social Analysis and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. 


SOCI   251/01   CRN 40338             Race and Ethnicity
Smith, Buffy          OEC 452              SP        09/03-12/19               M W F             1215-1320

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social  distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between  majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels,  nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies and fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: sophomore standing


SOCI   330/01   CRN 42387             Religion in American Society
Schuth, Katarina     BEC LL03           SP  09/03-12/19                     T                      1730-2115

Theoretical and empirical examination of the sociological dimensions of religion, with a special emphasis on the religious situation in America. Topics include diverse religious expressions and values of each religion, including Christian denominations and other world religions with members living in the U.S., for example, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism, as well as cultural contexts, organizational structures, individual religiosity, and emerging new forms. This course meets a requirement in Catholic Studies and fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: SOCI 100

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